Chemistry and Biochemistry

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

Courses

For course descriptions not found in the UC San Diego General Catalog, 2014–15, please contact the department for more information.

Lower Division

4. Basic Chemistry (4)

Offers less-well prepared science majors the fundamental skills necessary to succeed in Chem 6. Emphasizes quantitative problems. Topics include nomenclature, stoichiometry, basic reactions, bonding, and the periodic table. May not receive credit for both Chem 4 and Chem 11. Includes a laboratory/discussion each week. Recommended: concurrent enrollment in Math 3C, 4C or 10A or higher. (F)

6A. General Chemistry I (4)

First quarter of a three-quarter sequence intended for science and engineering majors. Topics include: atomic theory, bonding, molecular geometry, stoichiometry, types of reactions, and thermochemistry. May not be taken for credit after Chem 6AH. Recommended: proficiency in high school chemistry and/or physics; concurrent or prior enrollment in Math 10A or 20A. (F,W,S)

6AH. Honors General Chemistry I (4)

First quarter of a three-quarter honors sequence intended for well-prepared science and engineering majors. Topics include quantum mechanics, molecular orbital theory, and bonding. An understanding of nomenclature, stoichiometry, and other fundamentals is assumed. Students completing 6AH may not subsequently take 6A for credit. Recommended: completion of a high school physics course strongly recommended. Concurrent enrollment in Math 20A or higher. (F)

6B. General Chemistry II (4)

Second quarter of a three-quarter sequence intended for science and engineering majors. Topics include: covalent bonding, gases, liquids, and solids, colligative properties, physical and chemical equilibria, acids and bases, solubility. May not be taken for credit after Chem 6BH. Prerequisites: Chem 6A or 6AH and Math 10A or 20A. Recommended: concurrent or prior enrollment in Math 10B or 20B. (F,W,S)

6BH. Honors General Chemistry II (4)

Second quarter of a three-quarter honors sequence intended for well-prepared science and engineering majors. Topics include: colligative properties, bulk material properties, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, and thermodynamics. Three hours lecture and one hour recitation. Students completing 6BH may not subsequently take 6B for credit. Prerequisites: Chem 6AH and Math 20A. Recommended: concurrent or prior enrollment in Math 20B. (W)

6C. General Chemistry III (4)

Third quarter of a three-quarter sequence intended for science and engineering majors. Topics include: thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, and introductions to nuclear, main group organic, and biochemistry. May not be taken for credit after Chem 6CH. Prerequisites: Chem 6B or 6BH. Recommended: completion of Math 10B or 20B. (F,W,S)

6CH. Honors General Chemistry III (4)

Third quarter of a three-quarter honors sequence intended for well-prepared science and engineering majors. Topics are similar to those in 6C but are taught at a higher level and faster pace. Students completing 6CH may not subsequently take 6C for credit. Prerequisites: Chem 6BH and Math 20B. (S)

7L. General Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Condenses a year of introductory training in analytical, inorganic, physical, and synthetic techniques into one intensive quarter. A materials fee is required. A mandatory safety exam must be passed. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 7L and Chem 6BL. Prerequisites: Chem 6B or Chem 6BH. (F,W,S)

11. The Periodic Table (4)

Introduction to the material world of atoms and small inorganic molecules. Intended for nonscience majors. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 4 and Chem 11. (F,S)

12. Molecules and Reactions (4)

Introduction to molecular bonding and structure and chemical reactions, including organic molecules and synthetic polymers. Intended for nonscience majors. Prerequisites: Chem 11 or good knowledge of high school chemistry. Cannot be taken for credit after any organic chemistry course. (W)

13. Chemistry of Life (4)

Introduction to biochemistry for nonscience majors. Topics include carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and proteins, with an introduction to metabolic pathways in human physiology. Prerequisites: Chem 12. (S)

15. Chemistry of the Universe (4)

This is a one-quarter, nonmathematical chemistry course for nonscience majors covering the origin of the universe, the elements, and the formation of the solar system. The evolution of the Earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere will be covered, as well as contemporary problems in environmental chemistry. Cannot be taken for credit after any other chemistry course.

87. Freshman Seminar in Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)

This seminar will present topics in chemistry at a level appropriate for first-year students.

92. Undergraduate Pharmacology Seminar (1)

Selected topics in pharmacology and toxicology. (S)

96. Introduction to Teaching Science (2)

(Cross-listed with EDS 31.) Explores routine challenges and exceptional difficulties students often have in learning science. Prepares students to make meaningful observations of how K–12 teachers deal with difficulties. Explores strategies that teachers may use to pose problems that stimulate students’ intellectual curiosity.

99. Independent Study (2 or 4)

Independent literature or laboratory research by arrangement with and under the direction of a member of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty. Students must register on a P/NP basis. Prerequisites: lower-division standing, 3.0 minimum UC San Diego GPA, consent of instructor and department, completion of thirty units of undergraduate study at UC San Diego, completed and approved Special Studies form.

99R. Independent Study (1)

Independent study or research under the direction of a member of the faculty. Prerequisites: student must be of first-year standing and a Regent’s Scholar; approved Special Studies form.

Upper Division

100A. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Laboratory course emphasizing classical quantitative chemical analysis techniques, including separation and gravimetric methods, as well as an introduction to instrumental analysis. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6CH and Chem 6BL or 7L. Recommended: Phys 2CL or 2BL. Program or material fee may apply. (F,W,S)

100B. Instrumental Chemistry Laboratory (5)

Hands-on laboratory course focuses on development of correct laboratory work habits and methodologies for the operation of modern analytical instrumentation. Gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography, ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry, infrared spectrometry. Lecture focuses on fundamental theoretical principles, applications, and limitations of instrumentation used for qualitative and quantitative analysis. A materials fee is required. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 100B and Chem 101. Prerequisites: Chem 100A and Phys 2C or 2D and Phys 2CL or 2DL. (F,W,S)

100BL. Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (3)

Hands-on laboratory course focuses on the development of correct laboratory work habits and methodologies for the operation of modern analytical instrumentation. Gas chromatography, gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography, ion chromatography, atomic absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrometry, and infrared spectometry. Recommended preparation: Phys 2CL or 2BL. Chem 100BL is for undergraduates only. Program or material fee may apply. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 100BL and Chem 106. Prerequisites: Chem 100A and Phys 2A and Phys 2B and Phys 2D, concurrent enrollment with Chem 100B. (F,W,S)

104. Introduction to X-ray Crystallography (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 204.) Analysis of macromecular structures by X-ray diffraction. Topics include symmetry, geometry of diffraction, detection of diffraction, intensity of diffracted waves, phase problem and its solution, heavy atom method, isomorphous replacement, anomalous dispersion phasing methods (MAD), direct methods, molecular replacement. Prerequisites: Phys 2A–B.

105A. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Laboratory course in experimental physical chemistry. Prerequisites: one or more of Chem 126, 127, 131, 133 and Chem 100A, and Phys 2CL. A materials fee is required for this course. (F,W,S)

105B. Physical Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Laboratory course in experimental physical chemistry. Prerequisites: Chem 105A. A materials fee is required for this course. (F,W,S)

108. Protein Biochemistry Laboratory (6)

The application of techniques to study protein structure and function, including electrophoresis, protein purification, column chromatography, enzyme kinetics, and immunochemistry. Prerequisites: Chem 143A and Chem 114A. (Note: formerly Chem 112A. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 108 and BIBC 103.) A materials fee may be required for this course. (F,W)

109. Recombinant DNA Laboratory (6)

This laboratory will introduce students to the tools of molecular biology and will involve experiments with recombinant DNA techniques. Prerequisites: Chem 143A and Chem 114A. (Note: formerly Chem 112B. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 109 and BIMM 101.) A materials fee may be required for this course. (S)

113. Physical Chemistry of Biological Macromolecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 213.) A discussion of the physical principles governing biological macromolecular structure and function, and the physicochemical experiments used to probe their structure and function. Chem 213 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 113. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH; and Chem 127 or 131 (113); or graduate standing (213).

114A. Biochemical Structure and Function (4)

Introduction to biochemistry from a structural and functional viewpoint. Prerequisites: Chem 140A. (Note: Students may not receive credit for both Chem 114A and BIBC 100.) (F,W)

114B. Biochemical Energetics and Metabolism (4)

This course is an introduction to the metabolic reactions in the cell which produce and utilize energy. The course material will include energy-producing pathways: glycolysis, Krebs cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty-acid oxidation. Biosynthesis of amino acids, lipids, carbohydrates, purines, pyrimidines, proteins, nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Chem 114A or BIBC 100. (Note: Students may not receive credit for both Chem 114B and BIBC 102.) (W)

114C. Biosynthesis of Macromolecules (4)

Mechanisms of biosynthesis of macromolecules—particularly proteins and nucleic acids. Emphasis is on how these processes are controlled and integrated with metabolism of the cell. Prerequisites: Chem 114A or BIBC 100. (Note: students may not receive credit for both Chem 114C and BIMM 100.) (S)

114D. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 214.) This course represents a continuation of 114C, or an introductory course for first- and second-year graduate students, and covers topics in molecular and cellular biochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary approaches to the isolation and characterization of mammalian genes and proteins, and molecular genetic approaches to understanding eukaryotic development and human disease. Chem 214 students will be required to complete additional course work beyond that expected of students in Chem 114D. Prerequisites: Chem 114A-C or consent of instructor. (May not be offered every year.)

116. Chemistry of Enzyme Catalyzed Reactions (4)

A discussion of the chemistry of representative enzyme catalyzed reactions is presented. Enzyme reaction mechanisms and their relation to enzyme structure are emphasized. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH, and Chem 114A. (May not be offered every year.)

118. Pharmacology and Toxicology (4)

A survey of the biochemical action of drugs and toxins as well as their absorption and excretion. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH; and Chem 114A and 114B, or consent of instructor. Priority will be given to Pharmacological Chemistry majors. (S)

120A. Inorganic Chemistry I (4)

The chemistry of the main group elements in terms of atomic structure, ionic and covalent bonding. Structural theory involving s, p, and unfilled d orbitals. Thermodynamic and spectroscopic criteria for structure and stability of compounds and chemical reactions of main group elements in terms of molecular structure and reactivity. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6CH and Chem 140A. (F,S)

120B. Inorganic Chemistry II (4)

A continuation of the discussion of structure, bonding, and reactivity with emphasis on transition metals and other elements using filled d orbitals to form bonds. Coordination chemistry in terms of valence bond, crystal field, and molecular orbital theory. The properties and reactivities of transition metal complexes including organometallic compounds. Prerequisites: Chem 120A. (W)

123. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Synthesis, analysis, and physical characterization of inorganic chemical compounds. A materials fee is required for this course. Prerequisites: Chem 120A and 143AH or 143A. (W,S)

125. Bioinorganic Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 225.) The roles of metal ions in biological systems, with emphasis on transition metal ions in enzymes that transfer electrons, bind oxygen, and fix nitrogen. Also included are metal complexes in medicine, toxicity, and metal ion storage and transport. Chem 225 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 124. Prerequisites: Chem 114A or 120A or graduate standing. Recommended: Chem 114A and/or 120A or, for graduate students, their equivalents. (May not be offered every year.)

126. Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics (4)

With Chem 127, Chem 126 condenses Physical Chemistry into two quarters. They may be taken in either order. The emphasis is on biochemical and environmental applications. Quantum mechanics and molecular structure, spectroscopy. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 126 and Chem 133. Prerequisites: Chem 6B or 6AH, Phys 2C or 2D, and Math 20D. (F)

127. Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics (4)

With Chem 126, Chem 127 condenses Physical Chemistry into two quarters. They may be taken in either order. The emphasis is on biochemical and environmental applications. Thermodynamics, first and second laws, thermochemistry, chemical equilibrium, solutions, kinetic theory, reaction kinetics. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 127 and Chem 131. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6BH, Phys 2C or 2D, and Math 20C. (W)

130. Chemical Physics: Quantum Mechanics (4)

With Chem 131 and 132, Chem 130 is part of the Physical Chemistry sequence taught over three quarters. Recommended as the first course of the sequence. Key topics covered in this course include quantum mechanics, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and molecular structure. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 130 and Chem 133, or for both Chem 130 and Chem 126. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6CH, and Phys 2C or 2D, and Math 20D. (F)

131. Chemical Physics: Stat Thermo I (4)

With Chem 130 and 132, Chem 131 is part of the Physical Chemistry sequence taught over three quarters. Recommended as the second course of the sequence. Key topics covered in this course include thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, and chemistry of solutions. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 131 and Chem 127. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6CH, Math 20C, and Phys 2C or 2D. (W)

132. Chemical Physics: Stat Thermo II (4)

With Chem 130 and 131, Chem 132 is part of the Physical Chemistry sequence taught over three quarters. Recommended as the third course of the sequence. Key topics covered in this course include chemical statistics, kinetic theory, and reaction kinetics. Prerequisites: Chem 130 or 133, and Chem 131. (S)

135. Molecular Spectroscopy (4)

Time-dependent behavior of systems; interaction of matter with light; selection rules. Radiative and nonradiative processes, coherent phenomena, and the density matrices. Instrumentation, measurement, and interpretation. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem 105A recommended. Prerequisites: Chem 133 and Math 20D. (S)

140A. Organic Chemistry I (4)

Introduction to organic chemistry, with applications to biochemistry. Bonding theory, isomerism, stereochemistry, chemical and physical properties. Introduction to substitution, addition, and elimination reactions. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 140A and Chem 141A. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or equivalent course in general chemistry. (F,W,S)

140B. Organic Chemistry II (4)

Continuation of Organic Chemistry I, 140A. Methods of analysis, chemistry of hydrocarbons, chemistry of the carbonyl group. Introduction to the reactions of biologically important molecules. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 141B and Chem 140B. Prerequisites: Chem 140A (a grade of C or higher in Chem 140A is strongly recommended). (F,W,S)

140AH. Honors Organic Chemistry I (4)

Rigorous introduction to organic chemistry, with preview of biochemistry. Bonding theory, isomerism, stereochemistry, physical properties, chemical reactivity. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 140AH and Chem 140A. Prerequisites: B+ or higher grade in Chem 6C or 6CH.

140BH. Honors Organic Chemistry (4)

Organic chemistry course for honors-level students with a strong background in chemistry. Similar to Chem 140B, but emphasizes mechanistic aspects of reactions and effects of molecular structure on reactivity. Students may not receive credit for Chem 140B and Chem 140BH. Prerequisites: grade of B or higher in Chem 140A.

140C. Organic Chemistry III (4)

Continuation of Organic Chemistry I (140A) and Organic Chemistry II (140B). Organic chemistry of biologically important molecules: carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, proteins, fatty acids, biopolymers, natural products. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 140C and Chem 141C. Prerequisites: Chem 140B (a grade of C or higher in Chem 140B is strongly recommended). (F,W,S)

140CH. Honors Organic Chemistry (4)

Continuation of Organic Chemistry 140B or 140BH, at honors level. Chemistry of carbonylic acids, carbohydrates, proteins, lipids biopolymers, natural products. Emphasis on mechanistic aspects and structure reactivity relationships. Prerequisites: grade of B+ or higher in Chem 140B, or B– higher in Chem 140BH.

143A. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Introduction to organic laboratory techniques. Separation, and purification, spectroscopy, product analysis, and effects of reaction conditions. Prerequisites: Chem 6BL or 7L, and Chem 140A or Chem 140AH. A materials fee is required. A mandatory safety exam must be passed within the first two weeks. (Note: students may not receive credit for both Chem 143A and Chem 143AH.)

143AH. Honors Organic Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Organic chemistry laboratory for chemistry majors and other honors-level students with strong background in Chem 140A. Similar to Chem 143A, but emphasizes instrumental methods of product identification, separation, and analysis. A materials fee is required. A mandatory safety exam must be passed within the first two weeks. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 143A and Chem 143AH. Prerequisites: Chem 7L and B or better grade in Chem 140A. (W)

143B. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (4)

Continuation of Chem 143AH or 143A, emphasizing synthetic methods of organic chemistry. Prerequisites: Chem 143AH or 143A, Chem 140B (may be taken concurrently). Enrollment is limited to majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, unless space is available. A materials fee is required for this course. (W,S)

143C. Organic Chemistry Laboratory (5)

Identification of unknown organic compounds by a combination of chemical and physical techniques. This course is intended for chemistry majors only. Program or material fee may apply. Prerequisites: Chem 143 AH or 143A and Chem 140B. Must be chemistry major (CH25, CH28, CH31, CH32, CH33, CH34, CH35, CH36, CH37). (F)

143D. Molecular Design and Synthesis (4)

Advanced organic synthesis. Relationships between molecular structure and reactivity using modern synthetic methods and advanced instrumentation. Stresses importance of molecular design, optimized reaction conditions for development of practically useful synthesis, and problem-solving skills. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH and Chem 143B. A materials fee is required for this course. (S)

145. Chemistry and Biochemistry of Biofuels (4)

Fundamentals of the chemistry and biochemistry of petroleum and biofuel technologies. This course explores chemical identity and properties, metabolic pathways and engineering, refining processes, and analytical techniques related to current and future biofuels. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH.

146. Kinetics and Mechanism of Organic Reactions (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 246.) Methodology of mechanistic organic chemistry; integration of rate expression, determination of rate constants, transition state theory; catalysis, kinetic orders, isotope effects, solvent effects, linear free energy relationship; product studies, stereochemistry; reactive intermediates; rapid reactions. Chem 246 students will be required to complete an additional term project beyond that expected of students in Chem 146. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (146) or graduate standing (246). (May not be offered every year.)

151. Molecules that Changed the World (4)

A look at some of nature’s most intriguing molecules and the ability of man to discover, synthesize, modify, and use them. The role of chemistry in society, and how chemical synthesis—the art and science of constructing molecules—shapes our world. Prerequisites: Chem 140A or equivalent.

152. Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 252; formerly Chem 148.) A survey of reactions of particular utility in the organic laboratory. Emphasis is on methods of preparation of carbon-carbon bonds and oxidation reduction sequences. Chem 252 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students enrolled in Chem 152. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (152); or graduate standing (252).

154. Mechanisms of Organic Reactions (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 254; formerly Chem 147.) A qualitative approach to the mechanisms of various organic reactions; substitutions, additions, eliminations, condensations, rearrangements, oxidations, reductions, free-radical reactions, and photochemistry. Includes considerations of molecular structure and reactivity, synthetic methods, spectroscopic tools, and stereochemistry. The topics emphasized will vary from year to year. This is the first quarter of the advanced organic chemistry sequence. Chem 254 students will be required to complete an additional paper/exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 154. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (154); or graduate standing (254).

155. Synthesis of Complex Molecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 255; formerly Chem 144.) This course discusses planning economic routes for the synthesis of complex organic molecules. The uses of specific reagents and protecting groups will be outlined as well as the control of stereochemistry during a synthesis. Examples will be selected from the recent literature. Chem 255 students will be required to complete an additional paper/exam. (May not be offered every year.) Prerequisites: Chem 152 or 252 or consent of instructor.

156. Structure and Properties of Organic Molecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 256.) Introduction to the measurement and theoretical correlation of the physical properties of organic molecules. Topics covered include molecular geometry, molecular-orbital theory, orbital hybridization, aromaticity, chemical reactivity, stereochemistry, infrared and electronic spectra, photochemistry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Chem 256 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students of Chem 156. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (156); or graduate standing (256).

157. Bioorganic and Natural Products Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 257.) A comprehensive survey of modern bioorganic and natural products chemistry. Topics will include biosynthesis of natural products, molecular recognition, and small molecule-biomolecule interactions. For Chem 257, students will be required to complete additional course work beyond that expected of students enrolled in Chem 157. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (157); or graduate standing (257).

158. Applied Spectroscopy (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 258.) Intensive coverage of modern spectroscopic techniques used to determine the structure of organic molecules. Problem solving and interpretation of spectra will be strongly emphasized. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH.

161. Supramolecular Coordination Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 261.) An introduction and survey of modern coordination chemistry. Topics will include structure and bonding of alkali, transition, lanthanide and actinide metals, with emphasis on the first row transition metals; stereochemistry, coordination clusters, molecular solids and nanoparticles. Prerequisites: Chem 120A and 120B or equivalent.

164. Structural Biology of Viruses (4)

(Cross-listed with BIMM 164.) An introduction to virus structures, how they are determined, and how they facilitate the various stages of the viral life cycle from host recognition and entry to replication, assembly, release, and transmission to uninfected host cells. (May not be offered every year.) Prerequisites: Chem 114A or BIBC 100. Recommended: a basic course in cell biology.

165. 3D Electron Microscopy of Macromolecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 265; cross-listed with BIMM 162/BGGN 262.) Biological macromolecules and supramolecular complexes as well as organelles, and small cells are being examined in three-dimensions by modern electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction techniques. The basic principles of transmission electron microscopy and 3D image reconstruction are discussed. Chem 265/BGGN 262 students will be required to complete an additional assignment/exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 165/BIMM 162. Prerequisites: Chem 114A or BIBC 100 or BIBC 110, and Phys 1A-B-C or Phys 2A-B-D.

167. Medicinal Chemistry (4)

Basics of medicinal chemistry, emphasizing rigorous descriptions of receptor-protein structure, interactions, and dynamics; their implications for drug development; and an integrated treatment of pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic considerations in drug design. Treats computational approaches as well as practical experimental approaches. Prerequisites: Chem140C or 140CH and Chem 114B and Chem 118.

168. Drug Synthesis and Design (4)

Practical methods to make drugs currently in use and to design future drugs. Treats both chemical synthesis and biologics like monoclonal antibodies. Topics include fragment-based screening, solid phase synthesis, directed evolution, and bioconjugation as well as efficacy, metabolism, and toxicity. Recommended preparation: Chem 114C. Prerequisites: Chem140C or 140CH and Chem 114B.

171. Environmental Chemistry I (4)

An introduction to chemical concerns in nature with emphasis on atmospheric issues like air pollution, chlorofluorocarbons and the ozone hole, greenhouse effects and climate change, impacts of radioactive waste, sustainable resource usage, and risks and benefits of energy sources. Students may not receive credit for both Chem 149A and Chem 171. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6CH. (F)

172. Environmental Chemistry II (4)

An introduction to chemical concerns in nature with emphasis on soil and water issues like agricultural productivity, biological impacts in the environment, deforestation, ocean desserts, natural and manmade disasters (fires, nuclear winter, volcanoes), and waste handling. Recommended preparation: Chem 171 (formerly 149A). Students may not receive credit for both Chem 172 and Chem 149B. Prerequisites: Chem 6C or 6CH. (W)

173. Atmospheric Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 273.) Chemical principles applied to the study of atmospheres. Atmospheric photochemistry, radical reactions, chemical lifetime determinations, acid rain, greenhouse effects, ozone cycle, and evolution are discussed. Chem 273 students will be required to complete an additional assignment/exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 173. Prerequisites: Chem 171 and Chem 127 or 132(173); or graduate standing (273). (S)

174. Chemical Principles of Marine Systems (4)

(Cross-listed with SIO 141.) Introduction to the chemistry and distribution of the elements in seawater, emphasizing basic chemical principles such as electron structure, chemical bonding, and group and periodic properties and showing how these affect basic aqueous chemistry in marine systems. Prerequisites: Chem 6C with a grade of C– or better, or consent of instructor. (May not be offered every year.)

182. Biological Databases (4)

(Cross-listed with BIMM 182/BENG 182/CSE 182.) This course provides an introduction to the features of biological data, how those data are organized efficiently in databases, and how existing data resources can be utilized to solve a variety of biological problems. Object oriented databases, data modeling, and description. Survey of current biological database with respect to above, implementation of database on a biological topic. Prerequisites: CSE 100 or Math 176. Bioinformatics majors only.

184. Computational Molecular Biology (4)

(Cross-listed with BIMM 184/BENG 184/CSE 184.) This advanced course covers the application of machine learning and modeling techniques to biological systems. Topics include gene structure, recognition of DNA and protein sequence patterns, classification, and protein structure prediction. Pattern discovery, Hidden Markov models/support vector machines/neural network/profiles, protein structure prediction, functional characterization or proteins, functional genomics/proteomics, metabolic pathways/gene networks. Prerequisites: BIMM 181 or BENG 181 or CSE 181; BIMM 182 or BENG 182 or CSE 182 or Chem 182. Bioinformatics majors only.

185. Introduction to Computational Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 285.) Course in computational methods building on a background in mathematics and physical chemistry. Brief introduction and background in computational theory, molecular mechanics, semi-empirical methods, and ab initio-based methods of increasing elaboration. Emphasis on applications and reliability. Chem 285 students will be required to complete an additional assignment/exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 185. Prerequisites: Chem 126 or 133 and Math 20C or 21C. (May not be offered every year.)

187. Foundations of Teaching and Learning Science (4)

(Cross-listed with EDS 122.) Examine theories of learning and how they are important in the science classroom. Conceptual development in the individual student, as well as the development of knowledge in the history of science. Key conceptual obstacles in science will be explored. Prerequisites: Chem 6C and Chem 96.

188. Capstone Seminar in Science Education (4)

(Cross-listed with EDS 123.) In the lecture and observation format, students continue to explore the theories of learning in the science classroom. Conceptual development is fostered, as well as continued development of knowledge of science history. Students are exposed to the science of teaching in science in actual practice. Prerequisites: Chem 6C and Chem 187/EDS 122.

192. Senior Seminar in Chemistry and Biochemistry (1)

The Senior Seminar Program is designed to allow senior undergraduates to meet with faculty members in a small group setting to explore an intellectual topic in chemistry or biochemistry. May be taken for credit up to four times, with a change in topic, and permission of the department. Prerequisites: department stamp and/or consent of the instructor.

194. Special Topics in Chemistry (2)

Selected topics in the field of chemistry. Course will vary in title and content. Students are expected to actively participate in course discussions, read, and analyze primary literature. Current subtitles will be listed on the Schedule of Classes. May be taken for credit up to four times as topics vary. Students may not receive credit for the same topic.

195. Methods of Teaching Chemistry (4)

An introduction to teaching chemistry. Students are required to attend a weekly class on methods of teaching chemistry, and will teach a discussion section of one of the lower-division chemistry courses. Attendance at lecture of the lower-division course in which the student is participating is required. (P/NP grades only.) Prerequisites: consent of instructor. (F,W,S)

196. Reading and Research in Chemical Education (2 or 4)

Independent literature or classroom research by arrangement with, and under the direction of, a member of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty. Students must register on a P/NP basis. Prerequisites: upper-division standing, 2.5 minimum GPA, consent of instructor and department. (F,W,S)

197. Chemistry Internship (2 or 4)

An internship program that provides work experience with public/private sector employers. Subject to the availability of positions, students will work in a local company under the supervision of a faculty member and site supervisor. P/NP grades only. May be taken for credit three times. Prerequisites: Completion of ninety units with a GPA of 2.5, and a completed and approved Special Studies form (UC San Diego Application for Enrollment Special Studies Courses 197, 198, 199), and department stamp. (F,W,S)

199. Reading and Research (2 or 4)

Independent literature or laboratory research by arrangement with, and under the direction of, a member of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty. Students must register on a P/NP basis. Prerequisites: upper-division standing, 2.5 minimum GPA, consent of instructor and department. (F,W,S)

Graduate

200B. Fundamentals of Instrumental Analysis (4)

Fundamental theoretical principles, capabilities, applications, and limitations of modern analytical instrumentation used for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Students will learn how to define the nature of an analytical problem and how to select an appropriate analytical method. Letter grades only. Recommended preparation: background equivalent to Chem 100A and introductory optics and electricity from physics. (W)

204. Introduction to X-ray Crystallography (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 104.) Analysis of macromecular structures by X-ray diffraction. Topics include symmetry, geometry of diffraction, detection of diffraction, intensity of diffracted waves, phase problem and its solution, heavy atom method, isomorphous replacement, anomalous dispersion phasing methods (MAD), direct methods, molecular replacement. Chem 204 students will be required to complete additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 104.

207. Protein NMR (4)

A broad introduction to the uses of nuclear magnetic resonance to characterize and understand proteins. Not highly mathematical, this course should be accessible to chemistry graduate students working with proteins.

209. Macromolecular Recognition (4)

Structures and functions of nucleic acids, folding and catalysis of nucleic acids, motifs and domains of proteins, principles of protein-protein interactions, chemistry of protein/DNA and protein/RNA interfaces, conformational changes in macromolecular recognition. Prerequisites: biochemistry background and graduate standing, or approval of instructor.

210. Lipid Cell Signaling Genomics, Proteomics, and Metabolomics (2)

Overview of new systems biology “-omics” approached to lipid metabolism and cell signaling, including interrogating gene and lipid databases, techniques for lipidomics, and implications for profiling and biomarker discovery in blood and tissues relevant to inflammatory and other human diseases. Cross-listed with BIOM 209 and PHAR 208. Recommended preparation: one quarter of undergraduate biochemistry.

213. Physical Chemistry of Biological Macromolecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 113.) A discussion of the physical principles governing biological macromolecular structure and function, and the physicochemical experiments used to probe their structure and function. Chem 213 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 113. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH; and Chem 127 or 131 (113); or graduate standing (213).

214. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 114D.) This course represents a continuation of 114C, or an introductory course for first- and second-year graduate students, and covers topics in molecular and cellular biochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary approaches to the isolation and characterization of mammalian genes and proteins, and molecular genetic approaches to understanding eukaryotic development and human disease. Chem 214 students will be required to complete additional course work beyond that expected of students in Chem 114D. Prerequisites: Chem 114A–C or consent of instructor. (May not be offered every year.)

215. Modeling Biological Macromolecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 115; cross-listed with PHAR 205/BIOM 205.) Use of computer graphics and modeling methods in the study of biological macromolecules. The course will cover basic methods and techniques. The objective is to provide a good working knowledge of the critical features of the methods and to provide a foundation for further study for those who wish to pursue these methods as research topics. Chem 215/BIOM 205/PHAR 205 students will be required to complete additional course work beyond that expected of students in Chem 115. Prerequisites: Chem 114A or equivalent. (May not be offered every year.)

216. Chemical Biology (4)

A discussion of current topics in chemical biology including mechanistic aspects of enzymes and cofactors, use of modified enzymes to alter biochemical pathways, chemical intervention in cellular processes, and natural product discovery. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. (May not be offered every year.)

217. RNA Structure, Function, and Biology (4)

Selected topics in RNA structure and function, such as the ribosome, ribozyme, antibiotics, splicing and RNA interference, as they relate to the RNA role in gene expression and regulation. Emphasis on techniques to study the dynamics of macromolecular complexes and the mechanism of RNA catalysis. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

219. Special Topics in Biochemistry (4)

This special topics course is designed for first-year graduate students in biochemistry. Topics presented in recent years have included protein processing, the chemical modification of proteins, the biosynthesis and function of glycoproteins, lipid biochemistry and membrane structure, and bioenergetics. Prerequisites: undergraduate courses in biochemistry, Chem 114A or equivalent. (May not be offered every year.)

220. Regulatory Circuits in Cells (4)

Modulation cellular activity and influencing viral fate involve regulatory circuits. Emergent properties include dose response, cross-regulation, dynamic, and stochastic behaviors. This course reviews underlying mechanisms and involves mathematical modeling using personal computer tools. Recommended: some background in biochemistry and/or cellular biology. Mathematical competence at the level of lower-division college courses.

221. Signal Transduction (4)

The aim of this course is to develop an appreciation for a variety of topics in signal transduction. We will discuss several historical developments while the focus will be on current issues. Both experimental approaches and results will be included in our discussions. Topics may vary from year to year. Prerequisites: biochemistry and molecular biology. (May not be offered every year.)

222. Structure and Analysis of Solids (4)

(Cross-listed with MATS 227.) Key concepts in the atomic structure and bonding of solids such as metals, ceramics, and semiconductors. Symmetry operations, point groups, lattice types, space groups, simple and complex inorganic compounds, structure/property comparisons, structure determination with X-ray diffraction. Ionic, covalent, metallic bonding compared with physical properties. Atomic and molecular orbitals, bands versus bonds, free electron theory.

223. Organometallic Chemistry (4)

A survey of this field from a synthetic and mechanistic viewpoint. Fundamental reactivity patterns for transition element organometallic compounds will be discussed and organized according to periodic trends. Transition metal catalyzed reactions of importance to organic synthesis and industrial chemistry will be presented from a mechanistic perspective. Letter grades only. Prerequisites: graduate standing.

224. Spectroscopic Techniques (4)

Application of physical techniques to the elucidation of the structure of inorganic complex ions and organometallic compounds. Topics covered include group theory, and its application to vibrational, magnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy. (May not be offered every year.)

225. Bioinorganic Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 125.) The role of metal ions in biological systems, with emphasis on transition metal ions in enzymes that transfer electrons, bind oxygen, and fix nitrogen. Also included are metal complexes in medicine, toxicity, and metal ion storage and transport. Chem 225 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 125. Prerequisites: Chem 114A or 120A, or graduate standing. (May not be offered every year.)

226. Transition Metal Chemistry (4)

Advanced aspects of structure and bonding in transition metal complexes with major emphasis on Molecular Orbital Theory. Electronic structure descriptions are used to rationalize structure/reactivity relationships. Other topics include computational chemistry, relativistic effects, metal-metal bonding, and reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

227. Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry (2)

Seminars presented by faculty and students on topics of current interest in inorganic chemistry, including areas such as bioinorganic, organometallic and physical-inorganic chemistry. The course is designed to promote a critical evaluation of the available data in specialized areas of inorganic chemistry. Each quarter three or four different topics will be discussed. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. (S/U grades only.)

228. Solid State Chemistry (4)

Survey of the chemistry of semiconductors, superconductors, molecular magnetic materials, zeolites, fast ion conductors, electronically conducting polymers and ceramics. Synethetic techniques such as molecular precursor design, the sol-gel process, electrosynthesis, and high-temperature thermolysis will be covered. (May not be offered every year.)

229. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (2–4)

Selection of topics of current interest. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. (May not be offered every year.)

230A. Quantum Mechanics I (4)

Theoretical basis of quantum mechanics; postulates; wave packets; matrix representations; ladder operators; exact solutions for bound states in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions; angular momentum; spin; variational approximations; description of real one and two electron systems. Recommended background: Chem 133 and Math 20D or their equivalents.

230B. Quantum Mechanics II (4)

Continuation of theoretical quantum mechanics: evolution operators and time dependent representations, second quantization, Born-Oppenheimer approximation, electronic structure methods, selected topics from among density operators, quantized radiation fields, path integral methods, scattering theory. Prerequisites: Chem 230A or consent of instructor.

231. Chemical Kinetics and Molecular Reaction Dynamics (4)

Classical kinetics, transition state theory, unimolecular decomposition, potential energy surfaces; scattering processes and photodissociation processes. (May not be offered ever year.)

232A. Statistical Mechanics I (4)

Derivation of thermodynamics from atomic descriptions. Ensembles, fluctuations, classical (Boltzmann) and quantum (Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein) statistics, partition functions, phase space, Liouville equation, chemical equilibrium, applications to weakly interacting systems, such as ideal gases, ideal crystals, radiation fields. Recommended background: Chem 132 or its equivalent. Classical and quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, and mathematical methods will be reviewed as needed, but some background will be necessary.

232B. Statistical Mechanics II (4)

Interacting systems at equilibrium, both classical (liquids) and quantum (spins). Phase transitions. Non-equilibrium systems: glasses, transport, time correlation functions, Onsager relations, fluctuation-dissipation theorem, random walks, Brownian motion. Applications in biophysics. Prerequisites: Chem 232A or consent of instructor.

235. Molecular Spectroscopy (4)

Time-dependent behavior of systems; interaction of matter with light; selection rules. Radiative and nonradiative processes, coherent phenomena and the density matrices. Instrumentation, measurement, and interpretation. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. (May not be offered every year.)

239. Special Topics in Chemical Physics (2 or 4)

Topics of special interest will be presented. Examples include NMR, solid-state chemistry, phase transitions, stochastic processes, scattering theory, nonequilibrium processes, tensor transformations, and advanced topics in statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. (May not be offered every year.)

240. Electrochemistry (4)

(Cross-listed with NANO 255.) Application of electrochemical techniques to chemistry research. Basic electrochemical theory and instrumentation: the diffusion equations, controlled potential, and current methods. Electro-chemical kinetics, Butler-Volmer, Marcus-Hush theories, preparative electrochemistry, analytical electrochemistry, solid and polymer electrolytes, semiconductor photoelectrochemistry. (May not be offered every year.)

246. Kinetics and Mechanism (4)

Methodology of mechanistic organic chemistry: integration of rate expressions, determination of rate constants, transition state theory; catalysis, kinetic orders, isotope effects, substituent effects, solvent effects, linear free energy relationship; product studies, stereochemistry; reactive intermediates; rapid reactions. (May not be offered every year.)

250. Seminar in Chemistry (2)

Regularly scheduled seminars by first-year graduate students provide opportunities for practice in seminar delivery and for the exploration of topics of general interest. (S/U grades only.) (S)

251. Research Conference (2)

Group discussion of research activities and progress of the group members. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)

252. Synthetic Methods in Organic Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 152.) A survey of reactions of particular utility in the organic laboratory. Emphasis is on methods of preparation of carbon-carbon bonds and oxidation reduction sequences. For Chem 252, students would be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students enrolled in Chem 152. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (152), or graduate standing (252).

254. Mechanisms of Organic Reactions (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 154; formerly Chem 247.) A qualitative approach to the mechanisms of various organic reactions; substitutions, additions, eliminations, condensations, rearrangements, oxidations, reductions, free-radical reactions, and photochemistry. Includes considerations of molecular structure and reactivity, synthetic methods, spectroscopic tools, and stereochemistry. The topics emphasized will vary from year to year. This is the first quarter of the advanced organic chemistry sequence. Chem 254 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 154. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (154), or graduate standing (254).

255. Synthesis of Complex Molecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 155.) This course discusses planning economic routes for the synthesis of complex organic molecules. The uses of specific reagents and protecting groups will be outlined as well as the control of stereochemistry during a synthesis. Examples will be selected from the recent literature. Chem 255 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 155. (May not be offered every year.) Prerequisites: Chem 152 or 252 or consent of instructor.

256. Structure and Properties of Organic Molecules (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 156.) Introduction to the measurement and theoretical correlation of the physical properties of organic molecules. Topics covered include molecular geometry, molecular-orbital theory, orbital hybridization, aromaticity, chemical reactivity, stereochemistry, infrared and electronic spectra, photochemistry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Chem 256 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 156. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (156), or graduate standing (256).

257. Biorganic and Natural Products Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 157.) A comprehensive survey of modern bioorganic and natural products chemistry. Topics include biosynthesis of natural products, molecular recognition, and small molecule-biomolecule interactions. Chem 257 students will be required to complete additional course work beyond that expected of students in Chem 157. Prerequisites: Chem 140C or 140CH (157), or graduate standing (257).

258. Applied Spectroscopy (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 158.) Intensive coverage of modern spectroscopic techniques used to determine the structure of organic molecules. Problem solving and interpretation of spectra will be strongly emphasized. Students will be required to write and submit a paper that reviews a recent research publication that reports the structure determination by spectroscopic methods of natural products. Recommended: one year of organic chemistry with laboratory.

259. Special Topics in Organic Chemistry (2–4)

(Formerly Chem 249.) Various advanced topics in organic chemistry. Includes but is not limited to: advanced kinetics, advanced spectroscopy, computational chemistry, heterocyclic chemistry, medicinal chemistry, organotransition metal chemistry, polymers, solid-phase synthesis/combinatorial chemistry, stereochemistry, and total synthesis classics.

260. Light and Electron Microscopy of Cells and Tissue (4)

Students will review basic principles of light and electron microscopy and learn a variety of basic and advanced microscopy methods through lecture and hands-on training. Each student will have his or her own project. Additional supervised instrument time is available. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

261. Supramolecular Coordination Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 161.) An introduction and survey of modern coordination chemistry. Topics will include structure and bonding of alkali, transition, lanthanide, and actinide metals, with emphasis on the first row transition metals; stereochemistry, coordination clusters, molecular solids and nanoparticles. Chem 261 students will be required to complete additional course work beyond that expected of students in Chem 161. Prerequisites: Chem 120A, 120B or equivalent, or graduate standing.

262. Inorganic Chemistry and NMR (4)

A survey of inorganic chemistry to prepare for graduate research in the field, including a detailed introduction to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), followed by applications of NMR to structural and mechanistic problems in inorganic chemistry.

264. Structural Biology of Viruses (4)

(Cross-listed with BGGN 264.) An introduction of virus structures, how they are determined, and how they facilitate the various stages of the viral life cycle from host recognition and entry to replication, assembly, release, and transmission to uninfected host cells. Students will be required to complete a term paper. (May not be offered every year.) Recommended: elementary biochemistry as treated in Chem 114A or BIBC 100 and a basic course in cell biology or consent of the instructor.

265. 3D Electron Microscopy of Macromolecules (4)

(Cross-listed with BGGN 262.) Biological macromolecules and supramolecular complexes as well as organelles, and small cells are being examined in three-dimensions by modern electron cryomicroscopy and image reconstruction techniques. The basic principles of transmission electron microscopy and 3D image reconstruction are discussed. Chem 265/BGGN 262 students will be required to complete an additional oral presentation or paper or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 165/BGGN 162. (May not be offered every year.) Recommended: elementary biochemistry as treated in Chem 114A or BIBC 100 and a basic course in cell biology, or consent of instructor.

270A-B-C. Current Topics in Environmental Chemistry (2-2-2)

Seminar series on the current topics in the field of environmental chemistry. Emphasis is on current research topics in atmospheric, oceanic, and geological environments. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. (S/U grades only.) (May not be offered every year.)

271. Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (4)

Topics of special interest in analytical chemistry. May include, but is not limited to, chemical separation, sample introductions, mass analyzers, ionization schemes, and current state-of-the-art applications in environmental and biological chemistry.

273. Atmospheric Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 173.) Chemical principles applied to the study of atmospheres. Atmospheric photochemistry, radical reactions, chemical lifetime determinations, acid rain, greenhouse effects, ozone cycle, and evolution are discussed. Chem 273 students will be required to complete additional assignment/exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 173. Recommended: background comparable to Chem 149A and Chem 132. (S)

276. Numerical Analysis in Multiscale Biology (4)

Introduces mathematical tools to simulate biological processes at multiple scales. Numerical methods for ordinary and partial differential equations (deterministic and stochastic), and methods for parallel computing and visualization. Hands-on use of computers emphasized; students will apply numerical methods in individual projects. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. (S)

280. Applied Bioinformatics (4)

Publicly available databases and bioinformatics tools are now an indispensable component of biomedical research. This course offers an introductory survey of selected tools and databases; the underlying concepts, the software, and advice on using them. Practical exercises will be included.

283. Supramolecular Structure Determination Laboratory (4)

A laboratory course combining hands-on mass spectrometry and bioinformatics tools to explore the relationship between structure and function in macromolecules. Tools for peptide sequencing, analysis of post-translational modification, and fragmentation analysis by mass spectrometry are examples of experiments students will run. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.

285. Introduction to Computational Chemistry (4)

(Conjoined with Chem 185.) Course in computational methods building on a background in mathematics and physical chemistry. Brief introduction and background in computational theory, molecular mechanics, semi-empirical methods, and ab initio-based methods of increasing elaboration. Emphasis on applications and reliability. Chem 285 students will be required to complete an additional paper and/or exam beyond that expected of students in Chem 185. Prerequisites: Chem 126 or 133 and Math 20C. (May not be offered every year.)

288. Algorithms in Contemporary Computational Biology (4)

Course will focus on several topics in contemporary computational biology, including inference of gene modules, reconstructing gene regulatory network, and predicting signal transduction network. Algorithms that will be discussed include Bayesian network, hidden Markov model, and Markov chain Monte Carlo. Recommended: Chem 184 and basic concepts of probability, statistics, and molecular biology.

294. Organic Chemistry Seminar (2)

Formal seminars or informal puzzle sessions on topics of current interest in organic chemistry, as presented by visiting lecturers, local researchers, or students. Prerequisites: advanced graduate-student standing. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)

295. Biochemistry Seminar (2)

Formal seminars or informal puzzle sessions on topics of current interest in biochemistry, as presented by visiting lecturers, local researchers, or students. Prerequisites: advanced graduate-student standing. (S/U grades only.)

296. Chemical Physics Seminar (2)

Formal seminars or informal sessions on topics of current interest in chemical physics as presented by visiting lecturers, local researchers, or students. Prerequisites: advanced graduate-student standing. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)

297. Experimental Methods in Chemistry (4)

Experimental methods and techniques involved in chemical research are introduced. Hands-on experience provides training for careers in industrial research and for future thesis research. Prerequisites: graduate-student standing. (S/U grades only.)

298. Special Study in Chemistry (1–4)

Reading and laboratory study of special topics for first-year graduate students under the direction of a faculty member. Exact subject matter to be arranged in individual cases. (S/U grades only.) Prerequisites: first-year graduate-student standing. (F,W,S)

299. Research in Chemistry (1–12)

Prerequisites: graduate-student standing and consent of instructor. (S/U grades only.) (F,W,S)

500. Apprentice Teaching (4)

Under the supervision and mentorship of a course instructor, MS and PhD students serve as teaching assistants to undergraduate laboratory and lecture courses. To support teaching competency, regular meetings with the instructor and attendance at lectures are required. S/U grades only. May be taken for credit twelve times. Prerequisites: graduate-student standing and consent of instructor. (F,W,S)

509. Teaching Methods in Chemistry and Biochemistry (2)

This course explores teaching strategies specific to chemistry at the college level, and promotes the development of skills for facilitating active, student-centered learning in both lecture and laboratory settings. It is required for first-time teaching assistants. S/U grades only. Prerequisites: graduate-student standing and consent of instructor. (F,W,S)