Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

[ graduate program | courses | faculty ]

Undergraduate Affairs, Room 2906; Graduate Affairs, Room 2718
Jacobs Hall, Warren College
http:/ece.ucsd.edu/

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

Program Mission Statement

To educate tomorrow’s technology leaders.

Program Educational Objectives

Program Outcomes and Assessment

Program outcomes have been established based on the Program Educational Objectives. Graduates of the ECE Program in Electrical Engineering are expected to have

  1. an understanding of the underlying principles of, and an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering to electrical engineering problems
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  3. a knowledge of electrical engineering safety issues
  4. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs
    1. an ability to collaborate effectively with others
    2. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  6. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice, including familiarity with computer programming and information technology
  7. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
    1. an ability to communicate effectively in writing
    2. an ability to communicate effectively in speech
    3. an ability to communicate effectively with visual means
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
  9. a recognition of the need for, and the ability to engage in, lifelong learning
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues

The Undergraduate Programs

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers undergraduate programs leading to the BS in electrical engineering, engineering physics, and computer engineering, and the BA in electrical engineering and society. Each of these programs can be tailored to provide preparation for graduate study or employment in a wide range of fields. The Electrical Engineering Program is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

The Electrical Engineering Program has a common lower division and a very flexible structure in the upper division. After the lower-division core, all students take six breadth courses during the junior year. They must then satisfy a depth requirement, which can be met with five courses focused on some specialty, and a design requirement of at least one project course. The remainder of the program consists of seven electives, which may range as widely or as narrowly as needed.

The Engineering Physics Program is conducted in cooperation with the Department of Physics. Its structure is very similar to that of electrical engineering except the depth requirement includes seven courses and there are only five electives.

The Computer Engineering Program is conducted jointly with the Department of Computer Science and Engineering. It has a more prescribed structure. The program encompasses the study of hardware design, data storage, computer architecture, assembly languages, and the design of computers for engineering, information retrieval, and scientific research.

The BA—Electrical Engineering and Society Program intends to better prepare engineering students in the areas of social sciences and the humanities, as a response to the globalization of engineering and technology. We recognize that “engineering only” training may not be sufficient when students seek alternate career paths besides engineering upon graduation, such as in the law, finance, and public policy sectors.

For information about the program and about academic advising, students are referred to the section on ECE departmental regulations. In order to complete the programs in a timely fashion, students must plan their courses carefully, starting in their freshman year. Students should have sufficient background in high school mathematics so that they can take freshman calculus in the first quarter.

For graduation, each student must also satisfy general-education requirements determined by the student’s college. The six colleges at UC San Diego require widely different numbers of general-education courses. Students should choose their college carefully, considering the special nature of the college and the breadth of education required. They should realize that some colleges require considerably more courses than others. Students wishing to transfer to another college should see their college adviser.

Graduates of community colleges may enter ECE programs in the junior year. However, transfer students should be particularly mindful of the freshman and sophomore course requirements when planning their programs.

These programs have strong components in laboratory experiments and in the use of computers throughout the curricula. In addition, the department is committed to exposing students to the nature of engineering design. This is accomplished throughout the curricula by use of design-oriented homework problems, by exposure to engineering problems in lectures, by courses that emphasize student-initiated projects in both laboratory and computer courses, and finally by senior design-project courses in which teams of students work to solve an engineering design problem, often brought in from industry.

IT IS IMPERATIVE THAT STUDENTS DISCUSS THEIR CURRICULUM WITH THE APPROPRIATE DEPARTMENTAL ADVISER IMMEDIATELY UPON ENTRANCE TO UC SAN DIEGO, AND THEN AT LEAST ONCE A YEAR UNTIL GRADUATION.

BS Electrical Engineering Program

Students must complete 180 units for graduation, including the general-education requirements (GER). Note that 144 units (excluding GER) are required.

Lower-Division Requirements
(total of sixty-eight units)

Mathematics (twenty-four units)

Math 20A-B-C-D-E-F.

Physics (sixteen units)

Phys 2A-B-C-D or Phys 4A-B-C-D-E. Math 20A is a prerequisite for Phys 2A. Students whose performance on the mathematics placement test permits them to start with Math 20B or higher may take Phys 2A in the fall quarter of the freshman year.

Chemistry (four units)

Chem 6A.

Programming Course (four units)

ECE 15.

Electrical engineering (twenty units)

ECE 25, 30, 35, 45, and 65.

Additional Notes
  1. Students with AP math credit are strongly advised to take Math 20B in the fall quarter, leaving room for a GER in the winter quarter.
  2. The ECE undergraduate website shows sample course plans. Please refer to the website and consult with the staff advisers in the undergraduate offices, room 2906 in Jacobs Hall.

Upper-Division Requirements
(total of seventy-six units)

a. Electrical Engineering BREADTH Courses (twenty-four units)

Courses required of all electrical engineering majors:

The six courses, ECE 100, 101, 102, 103, 107, and 109 are required of all electrical engineering majors and they are an assumed prerequisite for senior-level courses, even if they are not explicitly required. Although the courses are largely independent, there are some prerequisites. Students who delay some of the breadth courses into the spring should be careful that it does not delay their depth sequence. For the ECE 109 requirement, credit will not be allowed for Econ 120A, MAE 108, Math 180A-B, Math 183, or Math 186.

b. Electrical Engineering DESIGN Course (four units)

Note: In order to fulfill the design requirement, students must complete one of the following courses with a grade C– or better. Graduation will not be approved until a written copy of the design project is submitted to the ECE undergraduate office. ECE 111, 118, 191 cannot be used to satisfy both the design and depth requirements.

The electrical engineering design requirement can be fulfilled in any of the following three ways:

  1. Take ECE 191. Engineering Group Design Project
  2. Take ECE 190. Engineering Design. This course requires the department stamp. Specifications and enrollment forms are available in the undergraduate office.
  3. Take one of the following courses:
    • ECE 111. Advanced Digital Design Project
    • ECE 118. Computer Interfacing
    • ECE 155B or 155C. Digital Recording Projects
    • Students who wish to take one of these courses to satisfy the design requirement must fill out an enrollment form and have departmental approval for the design credit prior to taking the course. The project must meet the same specifications as ECE 190.
c. Electrical Engineering ELECTIVES (twenty-eight units)

(For additional information, please refer to the section on “Elective Policy for Electrical Engineering and Engineering Physics Majors.”)

d. Electrical Engineering Depth Requirement (twenty units)

Students must complete a “depth requirement” of five quarter-courses to provide a focus for their studies. This set must include a clear chain of study that depend on the “breadth” courses. Students may choose one of the approved depth sequences listed below, or propose another with the approval of the department. For depth sequences that list four courses, students must complete an additional upper-division ECE course for the remaining fifth depth course requirement. Courses that are used to satisfy other major requirements such as ECE 100-109 are excluded. Guidelines for meeting the depth requirement can be obtained from the undergraduate office. ECE 111, and 118 cannot be used to satisfy both the design and depth requirements.

Communication Systems

ECE 153, ECE 154A, ECE 154B, ECE 154C, and ECE 158A

For the following depth sequences, students must select an additional upper-division ECE course to complete the fifth depth course requirement:

Electronics Circuits and Systems

ECE 163, ECE 164, ECE 165, ECE 166

Electronic Devices and Materials

ECE135A, ECE 135B, ECE 136L, ECE 183

Machine Learning and Controls

ECE 171A, ECE 174, ECE 175A, one of ECE 171B, ECE 172A, or ECE175B

Photonics

ECE 181, ECE 182, ECE 183, and either ECE 184 or ECE 185

Signal and Image Processing

ECE 153, ECE 161A, ECE 161B, ECE 161C

Computer System Design

CSE 141, ECE 165 and any two of ECE 118, ECE 158A, ECE 111 or CSE 143

BS Engineering Physics

Students must complete a total of 180 units for graduation, including the general-education requirements. Note that 146 units (excluding GER) are required.

All students will initially be placed in premajor status. Upon successful completion of the following courses (with a minimum 2.0 GPA by the end of the first three quarters if a transfer student, six quarters if an incoming freshman), students will be admitted into full engineering physics major status.

  1. Math 20A-B-C
  2. Phys 2A-B
  3. ECE 15, 25, and 35

To initiate the change from premajor status to full major status, transfer students must see the ECE undergraduate adviser by the end of their third quarter at UC San Diego; incoming freshmen by the end of their sixth quarter.

Please refer to the section “Undergraduate Regulations and Requirements” for important details.

Lower-Division Requirements
(total of seventy units)

Mathematics (twenty-four units)

Math 20A-B-C-D-E-F

Physics (sixteen units)

Phys 2A-B-C-D or Phys 4A-B-C-D-E. Math 20A is a prerequisite for Phys 2A. Students whose performance on the mathematics placement test permits them to start with Math 20B or higher may take Phys 2A in the fall quarter of the freshman year.

Physics Lab (two units)

Phys 2DL

Chemistry (four units)

Chem 6A

Programming Course (four units)

ECE 15

Electrical engineering (twenty units)

ECE 25, 30, 35, 45, and 65

Additional Notes
  1. Students with AP math credit are strongly advised to take Math 20B in the fall quarter, leaving room for a GER in the winter quarter.
  2. The ECE undergraduate website shows sample course plans. Please refer to the website and consult with the staff advisers in the undergraduate offices, room 2906 in Jacobs Hall.

Upper-Division Requirements
(seventy-six units)

a. Engineering Physics BREADTH Courses (twenty-four units)

The electrical engineering breadth courses ECE 100, 101, 102, 103, 107, and 109, are also required of engineering physics majors. However, because of the scheduling of Math 110A, Phys 110A and 130A, they can only be taken in a specific order (please consult the ECE website). For the ECE 109 requirement, credit will not be allowed for Econ 120A, MAE 108, Math 180A-B, Math 183, or Math 186.

b. Engineering Physics DESIGN Course (four units)

Note: In order to fulfill the design requirement, students must complete one of the following courses with a grade C– or better. Graduation will not be approved until a written copy of the design project is submitted to the ECE undergraduate office.

The engineering physics design requirement can be fulfilled in any of the following three ways:

  1. Take ECE 191. Engineering Group Design Project
  2. Take ECE 190. Engineering Design. This course requires the department stamp. Specifications and enrollment forms are available in the undergraduate office.
  3. Take one of the following courses:
    • ECE 111. Advanced Digital Design Project
    • ECE 118. Computer Interfacing
    • ECE 155B or 155C. Digital Recording Projects
    • Students who wish to take one of these courses to satisfy the design requirement must fill out an enrollment form and have departmental approval for the design credit prior to taking the course. The project must meet the same specifications as ECE 190.

c. Engineering Physics ELECTIVES (twenty units)

(For additional information, please refer to the section on “Elective Policy for Electrical Engineering and Engineering Physics Majors.”)

d. Engineering Physics DEPTH Courses (twenty-eight units)

All BS engineering physics students are required to take Phys 110A, 130A-B, 140A, Math 110A, ECE 123 and 166; or ECE 135A and 135B; or ECE 182 and (181 or 183).

Elective Policy for Electrical Engineering and Engineering Physics Majors

1. Technical Electives

Technical electives must be upper-division engineering, math or physics courses (except for the bioengineering track). At most one lower-division course in engineering may be used but it must receive prior approval from the ECE department. Certain courses listed below are not allowed as electives because of overlap with ECE courses.

Physics

All upper-division physics courses. Students may not receive upper-division elective credit for any lower-division physics courses.

Mathematics

Math 180A overlaps ECE 109 and therefore will not qualify for elective credit of either type. Math 183 or Math 186 will not be allowed as an elective. Math 163 will only be allowed as a professional elective. All lower-division mathematics is excluded from elective credit of either type.

Bioengineering

The following series of courses will provide “core” preparation in bioengineering and will satisfy up to five courses of the ECE elective requirements:

BILD 1, BILD 2, BE 100, BE 140A-B

The bioengineering department will guarantee admission to these courses for ECE students on a space available basis.

CSE

The following courses are excluded as electives: CSE 3, 4GS, 6GS, 5A, 7, 8A-B, 11, 123A (duplicates ECE 158A), 140 (duplicates ECE 25), 140L (duplicates ECE 35). CSE 12, 20, and 21 will count toward the three professional electives ONLY.

ECE

Upper-division ECE courses that are not used to satisfy any other requirements.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)

Credit will not be allowed for MAE 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 20, 105, 108, 139, 140, 143B, or 170.

Special Studies

Courses 195–199: At most four units of 195–199 may be used for elective credit.

2. Professional Electives

Professional electives are acceptable courses taken in one department. Normally these will be upper-division courses in engineering, mathematics, or physics. Students may also choose upper-division courses from other departments provided that they fit into a coherent professional program. In such cases, a lower-division prerequisite may be included in the electives. Courses other than upper-division engineering, mathematics, or physics must be justified in terms of such a program, and must be approved by the ECE department.

Biology and Chemistry

Of the three electives intended to allow for the professional diversity, one lower-division biology or chemistry course from BILD 1, 2, Chem 6B-C may be counted for credit in combination with two upper-division biology or chemistry courses. Furthermore, this will count only if the student can demonstrate to a faculty adviser that they constitute part of a coherent plan for professional/career development.

Upper-division biology and chemistry courses will count toward the three professional electives but not the three math/physics/engineering technical electives.

Economics

Suitable electives would include

Econ 1 and 3 followed by the courses in one of the following tracks:

Economics 1 and 2 followed by two courses in one of the following tracks:

Note: Econ 100A can be substituted for Econ 2.

Econ 1 and 100A followed by two courses in one of the following tracks:

Note: Econ 120A, and 158-159 will not be allowed as professional electives. If economics is chosen for professional electives, only three technical electives are required for electrical engineering majors, one technical elective for engineering physics majors.

BS Computer Engineering

Students wishing to pursue the computer engineering curriculum may do so in either the ECE or CSE department. The set of required courses and allowed electives is the same in both departments; please note that the curriculum requires eighteen upper-division courses. The Computer Engineering Program requires a total of 136 units (not including the general-education requirements).

The Computer Engineering Program offers a strong emphasis on engineering mathematics and other basic engineering science as well as a firm grounding in computer science. Students should have sufficient background in high school mathematics so that they can take freshman calculus in their first quarter. Courses in high school physics and computer programming, although helpful, are not required for admission to the program.

Lower-Division Requirements
(total of sixty-eight units)

Mathematics (twenty units)

Math 20A-B-C-D-F

Physics (twelve units)

Phys 2A-B-C, or Phys 4A-B-C. Math 20A is a prerequisite for Phys 2A. Students whose performance on the Department of Mathematics placement test permits them to start with Math 20B or a higher course may take Phys 2A in the fall quarter of the freshman year; all others will take Phys 2A in the winter quarter of the freshman year. Students who receive high grades in both calculus and physics in high school may substitute the major’s sequence, Phys 4A-B-C for Phys 2A-B-C.

Computer Science (twenty-four units)

CSE 11 or 8B,* 12, 15L, CSE 20 or Math 15A, CSE 21 or Math 15B, CSE 30, and CSE 91.

*Students without any programming experience are advised to take CSE 8A, CSE 8AL, and then CSE 8B, CSE 8BL, instead of CSE 11. CSE 11 is a faster-paced version of CSE 8A and CSE 8B, and requires experience in programming with a compiled language.

Electrical Engineering (twelve units)

ECE 35, ECE 45, ECE 65

Upper-Division Requirements
(total of sixty-eight units)

  1. All BS computer engineering students are required to take CSE 100 or Math 176, CSE 101 or Math 188, CSE 110, CSE 120, 140, 140L, 141, 141L.
  2. In addition, all BS computer engineering students must fulfill the following upper-division ECE requirements:
    • Engineering Probability and Statistics: ECE 109. This course can be taken in the sophomore year.
    • Electronic Circuits and Systems: ECE 108. The department recommends that this course be taken in the junior year.
    • Linear Systems: ECE 101.
  3. Technical electives: All BS computer engineering students are required to take seven technical electives.
    • One technical elective must be either ECE 111 or ECE 118.
    • Of the remaining six technical electives, five must be ECE or CSE upper-division or graduate courses.
    • The remaining course can be any computer science and engineering or electrical engineering upper-division or graduate course, or any other course listed under the section titled non-CSE/ECE electives. Other restrictions in the selection of technical electives are also given in the section “Electives.”

Notes for Selecting and Scheduling Classes for BS Computer Engineering

(All courses must be taken for a letter grade.)

  1. First Programming Course: CSE 11 is a faster-paced version of CSE 8A, CSE 8AL and CSE 8B. CSE 8B or CSE 11 must be taken before CSE 12.* Students may self-select which course they wish to take. Students without experience in programming in a compiled language are advised to take CSE 8A and CSE 8AL, and then CSE 8B, instead of CSE 11.
  2. CSE 11, and CSE 20/Math 15A can be taken in the same quarter. Please obtain department approval for enrollment permission at ugradinfo@cs.ucsd.edu.
  3. Students must complete seven technical electives for a total of twenty-eight units. Five of the seven technical electives must be CSE or ECE upper-division courses.

Electives

The discipline of computer engineering interacts with a number of other disciplines in a mutually beneficial way. These disciplines include mathematics, computer science, and cognitive science. The following is a list of upper-division courses from these and other disciplines that can be counted as technical electives.

At most four units of 197 may be used towards technical elective requirements. ECE/CSE 195 cannot be used towards course requirements. Undergraduate students must get instructor’s permission and departmental stamp to enroll in a graduate course.

Students may not get duplicate credit for equivalent courses. The UC San Diego General Catalog should be consulted for equivalency information and any restrictions placed on the courses. Additional restrictions are noted below. Any deviation from this list must be petitioned.

Computer Science with a Specialization in Bioinformatics

Students must petition department for technical elective credit not on approved list.

Mathematics

All upper-division courses except Math 168A-B, 179A-B, 183, 184A-B, 189A-B, and 195–199. If a student has completed CSE 167, then he or she cannot get elective credit for Math 155A. Students may receive elective credit for only one of the following courses: CSE 164A, Math 174, Math 173, Phys 105A-B, MAE 107, CENG 100. No credit for any of these courses will be given if Math 170A-B-C is taken. Students will receive credit for either Math 166 or CSE 105 (but not both), either Math 188 or CSE 101 (but not both), and either Math 176 or CSE 100 (but not both).

Credit will be given for only one of the following: ECE 109 or Math 183 or Econ 120A.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

All ECE upper-division courses except 195–199. Students may not get credit for both CSE 123A and ECE 158A. Credit will be given for only one of the following: ECE 109 or Math 183 or Econ 120A or MAE 108.

Cognitive Science

Sensation and Perception 101A, Learning, Memory, and Attention 101B, Language 101C, Distributed Cognition 102A, Cognitive Ethnography 102B, Cognitive Engineering 102C, Neuroanatomy and Physiology 107A, Systems Neuroscience 107B, Cognitive Neuroscience 107C, Programming Methods for Cognitive Science 108D, Neural Networks Models of Cognitive I 108E, Advanced Programming Methods for Cognitive Science 108F, Human Computer Interaction 120, Human Computer Interaction Programming 121, Natural and Artificial Symbolic Representational Systems 170, Neural Network Models of Cognition II 181, Representation, Search, and the Web 188.

Students may not get credit for both CSE 150 and Advanced Programming Methods for Cognitive Science 108F or for both CSE 151 and Artificial Intelligence Modeling II 182.

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE)

All upper-division MAE courses except MAE 108 and 140 (ONLY Computer Science majors may take MAE 140), and MAE 195-199.

Students may receive elective credit for only one of the following courses: CSE 164A, Math 174, Math 173, Phys 105A-B, CENG 100, MAE 107. Students may only get credit for one of the two courses, CSE 167 or MAE 152.

Economics

Microeconomics 100A-B-C, Game Theory 109, Macroeconomics 110A-B-C, Mathematical Economics 113, Econometrics 120A-B-C, Applied Econometrics 121, Decisions Under Uncertainty 171, Introduction to Operations Research 172A-B-C, Economic and Business Forecasting 178.

Credit will be given for only one of the following: ECE 109 or Math 183 or Econ 120A.

Linguistics

Phonetics 110, Phonology I 111, Phonology II 115, Morphology 120, Syntax I 121, Syntax II 125, Semantics 130, Mathematical Analysis of Languages 160, Computers and Language 163, Computational Linguistics 165, Principles of Discourse and Dialog 169, Psycholinguistics 170, Language and the Brain 172, and Sociolinguistics 175.

Engineering

Principles of Team Engineering 100, Team Engineering Laboratory 100L, Team Engineering 101 (see course description under the Jacobs School of Engineering section). Students are eligible to receive eight units of technical elective credit for completing a combination of ENG 100A (two units) and ENG 100L (two units). Students must complete one quarter of ENG 100A for two units, and one quarter of ENG 100L for a total of four units. With this combination, students will get credit for one technical elective. To receive credit for two technical electives, students must complete two more quarters of ENG 100L. This credit can be applied to fulfill the technical elective requirements.

Music

Computer Music II 172, Audio Production: Mixing and Editing 173.

Psychology

Introduction to Engineering Psychology 161.

BA Electrical Engineering and Society

Students must complete a total of 180 units for graduation, including the general-education requirements (GER). Note that 144 units (excluding GER) are required.

Lower-Division Requirements
(total of seventy-six units)

Mathematics (twenty-four units)

Math 20A-B-C-D-E-F

Physics (sixteen units)

Phys 2A-B-C-D or Phys 4A-B-C-D-E. Math 20A is a prerequisite for Phys 2A. Students whose performance on the mathematics placement test permits them to start with Math 20B or higher may take Phys 2A in the fall quarter of the freshman year.

Chemistry (four units)

Chem 6A

Programming Course (four units)

ECE 15

Electrical Engineering (twenty units)

ECE 25, 30, 35, 45, and 65

Elective Courses in Social Sciences and Humanities Studies (eight units)

These can be prerequisite courses for the upper-division depth sequence in social sciences/humanities. For instance, for history studies, this can be two history lower-division courses (HILD 2,7,10–12). Historically oriented HUM, MMW, and CAT courses would count as well. At least one lower-division course should have a writing component. For economics studies, this can be two lower-division courses (Econ 1, and Econ 4 for the finance track); or one lower-division course (Econ 1) plus one upper-division course for the data analysis track. For political science, the following courses may be utilized: Poli Sci10, Poli Sci11, Poli Sci12, Poli Sci13, Poli Sci30. For sociology studies, students will choose two lower-division courses from SOCI 1, 2, and 30, of which 30 is highly recommended.

Other courses in social sciences/humanities will be available after an agreement between ECE and the respective departments/programs are established and approved.

Additional Notes
  1. Students with AP math credit are strongly advised to take Math 20B in the fall quarter, leaving room for a GER in the winter quarter.
  2. The ECE undergraduate website shows sample course plans. Please refer to the website and consult with the staff advisers in the undergraduate offices, room 2906 in Jacobs Hall.

Upper-Division Requirements
(total of sixty-eight units)

a. Electrical Engineering BREADTH Courses (twenty-four units)

Courses required of all electrical engineering majors:

The six courses—ECE 100, 101, 102, 103, 107, and 109—are required of all electrical engineering majors and they are an assumed prerequisite for senior-level courses, even if they are not explicitly required. Although the courses are largely independent, ECE 65 is a prerequisite for ECE 100 and 102. Students who delay some of the breadth courses until the spring should be careful to not have delayed their depth sequence.

b. Electrical Engineering DESIGN Course (four units)

Note: In order to fulfill the design requirement, students must complete one of the following courses with a grade C– or better. When taking this course, the student has the option of having a portion of the project related to his/her social sciences/humanities study. Graduation will not be approved until a written copy of the design project is submitted to the ECE undergraduate office.

The electrical engineering design requirement can be fulfilled in any of the following three ways:

  1. Take ECE 191. Engineering Group Design Project
  2. Take ECE 190. Engineering Design. This course requires the department stamp. Specifications and enrollment forms are available in the undergraduate office.
  3. Take one of the following courses:
    • ECE 111. Advanced Digital Design Project
    • ECE 118. Computer Interfacing
    • ECE 155B or 155C. Digital Recording Projects
    • Students who wish to take one of these courses to satisfy the design requirement must fill out an enrollment form and have departmental approval for the design credit prior to taking the course. The project must meet the same specifications as ECE 190.

c. Electrical Engineering ELECTIVES (sixteen units)

Four upper-division engineering, mathematics, or physics courses.

d. Social Sciences/Humanities Studies Depth Requirement (twenty-four units)

Students must complete a depth requirement of at least six quarter courses to provide a focus for their studies. Sample depth programs for history and economics students are discussed below. Students may choose this demonstrated sequence or they may propose another with the approval of their faculty coadviser from the respective social sciences/humanities department.

History Studies (six courses, twenty-four units)

HISC 105. History of Environmentalism

HISC 106. The Scientific Revolution

HISC 107. The Emergence of Modern Science

HISC 108. Life Sciences in the Twentieth Century

HISC 111. The Atomic Bomb and the Atomic Age

HISC 115. History of Modern Medicine

HISC 131. Science Technology and Law

HISC 173/273. Seminar on Darwin and Darwinism

HILD 2A. United States History

HILD 7A. Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.

HILD 10. East Asia: The Great Tradition

HILD 11. East Asia and the West, 1279–1911

HILD 12. Twentieth-Century East Asia

HIUS 140. Economic History of the United States

HIUS 151. American Legal History since 1865

HIUS 187. Topics in American Social History

HIUS 148. The American City in the Twentieth Century

HIEU 143. European Intellectual History, 1870–1945

HIGR 222. Historical Scholarship on European History since 1850

HILA 102. Latin America in the Twentieth Century

Economics Studies

Track A: Finance (six courses, twenty-four units)

Track B: Data Analysis (seven courses, twenty-eight units, one of them can be taken during lower-division years)

Political Science Studies (six courses, twenty-four units)

Policy Analysis

At least four courses from

Poli Sci 160AA. Introduction to Policy Analysis

Poli Sci 160AB. Introduction to Policy Analysis

Poli Sci 162. Environmental Policy

Poli Sci 163. Analyzing Politics

Poli Sci 165. Special Topic: Policy Analysis

Poli Sci 168. Policy Assessment

Poli Sci 170A. Introductory Statistics for Political Science and Public Policy

and at least two courses from

Poli Sci 100H. Race and Ethnicity in American Politics

Poli Sci 102J. Advanced Topics in Urban Politics

Poli Sci 103A. California Government and Politics

Poli Sci 103B. Politics and Policymaking in Los Angeles

Poli Sci 103C. Politics and Policymaking/San Diego

Poli Sci 125A. Communities and the Environment

Poli Sci 126AA. Fundamentals of Political Economy: Modern Capitalism

Poli Sci 142A. United States Foreign Policy

Poli Sci 142J. National Security Strategy

Poli Sci 142M. US Foreign Policy/Regional Security

Sociology Studies (six courses, twenty-four units)

Students may specialize in one of four departmental concentrations or complete the general sociology track.

Students will choose eight courses, two lower-division and six upper-division courses from their choice of concentrations in Science and Medicine, Law and Society, Economy and Society, International Studies, or General Sociology. Note: SOCI 30 is highly recommended for all tracks.

Concentration in Science and Medicine (eight courses, thirty-two units)

Students will choose two lower-division courses from SOCI 1, 2, and 30, of which 30 is highly recommended; and six upper-division courses from the list below.

Lower Division

SOCI 1. Introduction to Sociology

SOCI 2. The Study of Society

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society (highly recommended)

Upper Division

SOCI 113. Sociology of the AIDS Epidemic

SOCI 134A. The Making of Modern Medicine

SOCI 135. Medical Sociology

SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach

SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society

SOCI 138. Genetics and Society

SOCI 149. Sociology of the Environment

SOCI 167. Science and War

SOCI 168E. Sociology of Science

Concentration in Law and Society (eight courses, thirty-two units)

Students will choose two lower-division courses from SOCI 1, 2, and 30, of which 30 is highly recommended; and six upper-division courses from the list below.

Lower Division

SOCI 1. Introduction to Sociology

SOCI 2. The Study of Society

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society (highly recommended)

Upper Division

SOCI 112. Social Psychology

SOCI 142. Social Deviance

SOCI 143. Suicide

SOCI 160E. Law and Culture

SOCI 140. Sociology of Law

SOCI 140F. Law and the Workplace

SOCI 141. Crime and Society

SOCI 147. Organizations, Society, and Social Justice

SOCI 159. Special Topics in Social Organizations and Institutions

SOCI 163. Migration and the Law

Concentration in Economy and Society (eight courses, thirty-two units)

Students will choose two lower-division courses from SOCI 1, 2, and 30, of which 30 is highly recommended; and six upper-division courses from the list below.

Lower Division

SOCI 1. Introduction to Sociology

SOCI 2. The Study of Society

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society (highly recommended)

Upper Division

SOCI 125. Sociology of Immigration

SOCI 137. Sociology of Food

SOCI 121. Economy and Society

SOCI 132. Gender and Work

SOCI 139. Social Inequality: Class, Race, and Gender

SOCI 140F. Law and the Workplace

SOCI 148E. Inequality and Jobs

SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy

SOCI 163. Migration and the Law

SOCI 167. Science and War

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development

Concentration in International Studies (eight courses, thirty-two units)

Students will choose two lower-division courses from SOCI 1, 2, and 30, of which 30 is highly recommended; and six upper-division courses from the list below.

Lower Division

SOCI 1. Introduction to Sociology

SOCI 2. The Study of Society

SOCI 30. Science, Technology, and Society (highly recommended)

Upper Division

SOCI 130. Population and Society

SOCI 145. Violence and Society

SOCI 151. Comparative Race and Ethnic Relations

SOCI 148. Political Sociology

SOCI 153. Urban Sociology

SOCI 157. Religion in Contemporary Society

SOCI 158. Islam in the Modern World

SOCI 169. Citizenship, Community, and Culture

SOCI 176. War and Society

SOCI 177. International Terrorism

SOCI 178. The Holocaust

SOCI 179. Social Change

SOCI 180. Social Movements and Social Protest

SOCI 181. Modern Western Society

SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development

SOCI 187. African Societies Through Film

SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa

SOCI 188G. Chinese Society

SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society

SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics

SOCI 188J. Change in Modern South Africa

SOCI 189. Special Topics in Comparative-Historical Sociology

General Sociology (eight courses, thirty-two units)

Students will choose two lower-division courses from SOCI 1, 2, and 30, of which 30 is highly recommended; and six upper-division courses, including one from EACH of the following four concentrations:

Science and Medicine

Law and Society

Economy and Society

International Studies

Minor Curricula

ECE offers three minors in accord with the general university policy that a minor requires five upper-division courses. Students must realize that these upper-division courses have extensive lower-division prerequisites (please consult the ECE undergraduate office). Students should also consult their college provost’s office concerning the rules governing minors and programs of concentration.

Electrical Engineering: Twenty units chosen from the breadth courses ECE 101, 102, 103, 107, 108, 109.

Engineering Physics: Twenty units chosen from the junior year courses Phys 110A, 130A, Math 110A, ECE 101, 102, 103, 107, 108, 109.

Computer Engineering: Twenty units chosen from the junior year courses ECE 102, 108, CSE 100, 101, 105, 120, 140, 140L, 141, 141L.

The department will consider other mixtures of upper-division ECE, CSE, physics, and mathematics courses by petition.

Undergraduate Admissions, Policies, and Procedures

Freshman Eligibility

Effective fall 2015, admission to all four majors in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is currently restricted as described in the section “Acceptance to Departmental Majors in the Jacobs School of Engineering.” Acceptance into a capped engineering major is based on academic excellence demonstrated in high school. Acceptance will be granted to the maximum number of students in each of these capped major programs consistent with maintaining acceptable program quality and in compliance with admissions procedures and criteria approved by the Academic Senate’s Educational Policy Committee.

Engineering Physics

All students will initially be placed in premajor status. Upon successful completion of the following courses (with a minimum 2.0 GPA by the end of the first three quarters if a transfer student, six quarters if an incoming freshman), students will be admitted into full Engineering-Physics major status.

  1. Math 20A-B-C
  2. Phys 2A-B
  3. ECE 15, 25, and 35

To initiate the change from premajor status to full major status, transfer students must see the ECE undergraduate adviser by the end of their third quarter at UC San Diego; incoming freshmen by the end of their sixth quarter.

Transfer Students Eligibility

It is strongly recommended that transfer students complete the following course preparation for engineering majors:

*Refer to the UC San Diego General Catalog to select major prerequisite requirement for computer language courses.

Effective fall 2015, admission to all four majors in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is currently restricted as described in the section “Acceptance to Departmental Majors in the Jacobs School of Engineering.” Acceptance into a capped engineering major is based on academic excellence demonstrated in community college or accredited four-year university. Acceptance will be granted to the maximum number of students in each of these capped major programs consistent with maintaining acceptable program quality and in compliance with admissions procedures and criteria approved by the Academic Senate’s Educational Policy Committee.

Engineering Physics

Students are accepted into the premajor and must complete the following courses in order to be accepted into the engineering physics major: Math 20A-B-C, Phys 2A-B, ECE 15, 25, and 35. Students who wish to enter in the engineering physics major must contact the department before the beginning of the fall quarter, submitting course descriptions and transcripts for courses used to satisfy their lower-division requirements. Normally, admission will be for the fall quarter; students entering in the winter or spring quarter should be aware that scheduling difficulties may occur because upper-division sequences normally begin in the fall quarter.

Continuing Students Eligibility

The ECE department may grant admission to continuing undergraduate students who were not admitted to the department as entering students. Admission will be considered for students who have completed the screening courses below demonstrating special aptitude for the ECE curriculum.

Electrical engineering, engineering physics, electrical engineering and society majors:
Computer Engineering:

Students may apply in any quarter after they have completed the screening courses. They will be ranked according to grades received from the screening courses taken at UC San Diego. AP credit satisfies the requirement of the screening course but does not get factored into the GPA. All courses will be weighted equally. Applicants will be chosen from this ranking until all open slots in the major are filled. For information on how to change to an ECE major, go to ece.ucsd.edu/capped.

Grade Requirement in the Major

Courses required for the major must be taken for a letter grade. All major courses must be completed with a grade of C– or better.

A GPA of 2.0 is required in all upper-division courses in the major, including technical electives. The grade of D will not be considered an adequate prerequisite for any ECE course and will not be allowed for graduation. The engineering design requirement must be completed with a grade of C– or better.

Advising

Students are recommended to complete an academic planning form and to discuss their curriculum with the appropriate departmental adviser immediately upon entrance to UC San Diego, and then every year until graduation. This is intended to help students in: a) their choice of depth sequence, b) their choice of electives, c) keeping up with changes in departmental requirements.

New Transfer Students in Electrical Engineering and Engineering Physics

The entire curriculum is predicated on the idea of actively involving students in engineering from the time they enter as freshmen. The freshman courses have been carefully crafted to provide an overview of the engineering mindset with its interrelationships among physics, mathematics, problem solving, and computation. All later courses are specifically designed to build on this foundation. All transfer students should understand that the lower-division curriculum is demanding. Transfer students will be required to take all lower-division requirements or their equivalent. Transfer students are advised to consult the ECE website for sample recommended course schedules and for the ECE course requirement guide.

New Transfer Students in Computer Engineering

Transfer students are advised to consult the ECE website for sample recommended course schedules and for the ECE course requirement guide.

Students who do not have any programming experience are encouraged to take the CSE 8A-B sequence instead of CSE 11. Experience has shown that most students who are not familiar with programming and take CSE 11 have to retake the class because the accelerated pace makes it difficult to learn the new material.

Note: Transfer students are encouraged to consult with the ECE undergraduate office for academic planning upon entrance to UC San Diego.

ECE Honors Program

The ECE Undergraduate Honors Program is intended to give eligible students the opportunity to work closely with faculty in a project, and to honor the top graduating undergraduate students.

Eligibility for Admission to the Honors Program

  1. Students with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in the major and 3.25 overall will be eligible to apply. Students may apply at the end of the winter quarter of their junior year and no later than the end of the second week of fall quarter of their senior year. No late applications will be accepted.
  2. Students must submit a project proposal (sponsored by an ECE faculty member) to the honors program committee at the time of application.
  3. The major GPA will include ALL lower division required for the major and all upper division required for the major that are completed at the time of application (a minimum of twenty-four units of upper-division course work).

Requirements for Award of Honors

  1. Completion of all ECE requirements with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in the major based on grades through winter quarter of the senior year.
  2. Formal participation (i.e., registration and attendance) in the ECE 290 graduate seminar program in the winter quarter of their senior year.
  3. Completion of an eight-unit approved honors project (ECE 193H: Honors Project) and submission of a written report by the first day of spring quarter of the senior year. This project must contain enough design to satisfy the ECE BS four-unit design requirement.
  4. The ECE honors committee will review each project final report and certify the projects that have been successfully completed at the honors level.

Procedure for Application to the Honors Program

Between the end of the winter quarter of their junior year and the second week of the fall quarter of their senior year, interested students must advise the department of their intention to participate by submitting a proposal for the honors project sponsored by an ECE faculty member. Admission to the honors program will be formally approved by the ECE honors committee based on GPA and the proposal.

Unit Considerations

Except for the two-unit graduate seminar, this honors program does not increase a participant’s total unit requirements. The honors project will satisfy the departmental design requirement and students may use four units of their honors project course as a technical elective.

Five-Year BS/MS Program

Undergraduates in the ECE department who have maintained a good academic record in both departmental and overall course work are encouraged to participate in the five-year BS/MS program offered by the department. Participation in the program will permit students to complete the requirements for the MS degree within one year following receipt of the BS degree. Complete details regarding admission to and participation in the program are available from the ECE Undergraduate Affairs office.

Admission to the Program

Students should submit an application for the BS/MS program, including three letters of recommendation, by the program deadline during the spring quarter of their junior year. Applications are available from the ECE Undergraduate Affairs office. No GRE’s are required for application to the BS/MS program. A GPA of at least 3.0 both overall and in the major and strong letters of recommendation are required to be considered for program admission.

In the winter quarter of the senior year, applications of students admitted to the program will be forwarded by the department to the UC San Diego Office of Graduate Studies. Each student must submit the regular graduate application fee prior to the application deadline for their application to be processed. Students who have been accepted into the BS/MS program will automatically be admitted for graduate study beginning the following fall provided they maintain an overall GPA through the winter quarter of the senior year of at least 3.0. Upper-division (up to twelve units) or graduate courses taken during the senior year that are not used to satisfy undergraduate course requirements may be counted towards the forty-eight units required for the MS degree.

Continuation in the Program

Once admitted to the BS/MS program, students must maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in all courses through the winter quarter of the senior year and in addition must at all times maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA in their graduate course work. Students not satisfying these requirements may be re-evaluated for continuation in the program.

Admission for graduate study through the BS/MS program will be for the Master of Science degree only. Undergraduate students wishing to continue toward the PhD degree must apply and be evaluated according to the usual procedures and criteria for admission to the PhD program.

Curriculum

Students in the five-year BS/MS program must complete the same requirements as those in the regular MS program. Completion of the MS degree requirements within one year following receipt of the BS degree will generally require that students begin graduate course work in their senior year. All requirements for the BS degree should be completed by the end of the senior (fourth) year, and the BS degree awarded prior to the start of the fifth year. Courses taken in the senior year may be counted toward the BS degree requirements or the MS degree requirements, but not both. Students must have received their BS degree before they will be eligible to enroll as graduate students in the department.

The department offers graduate programs leading to the MS, and PhD degrees in electrical engineering. Students can be admitted into ECE graduate studies through either the MS or PhD programs.

The PhD program is strongly research oriented and is for students whose final degree objective is the PhD. If a student with a BS is admitted to this program, he or she will be expected to complete the requirements for the MS degree (outlined below) before beginning doctoral research. The MS is a technically intensive, research-oriented degree intended as preparation for advanced technical work in the engineering profession, or subsequent pursuit of a PhD.

In addition, the department offers MS and PhD programs in computer engineering jointly with CSE, and a PhD program in applied ocean science jointly with MAE and Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Admission to an ECE graduate program is in accordance with the general requirements of the UC San Diego graduate division, and requires at least a BS degree in engineering, physical sciences, or mathematics with a minimum upper-division GPA of 3.0. Applicants must provide three letters of recommendation and recent GRE General Test scores. TOEFL or IELTS scores are required from international applicants whose native language is not English. Applicants should be aware that the university does not permit duplication of degrees.

Support: The department makes every effort to provide financial support for PhD students who are making satisfactory progress. Support may take the form of a fellowship, teaching assistantship, research assistantship, or some combination thereof. International students will not be admitted unless there is reasonable assurance that support can be provided for the duration of their PhD program students in the MS program may also obtain support through teaching or research assistantships, but this is less certain.

Advising: Students should seek advice on requirements and procedures from the departmental graduate office and/or the departmental website http://www.ece.ucsd.edu. All students will be assigned a faculty academic adviser upon admission and are strongly encouraged to discuss their academic program with their adviser immediately upon arrival and subsequently at least once per academic year.