Psychology

[ graduate program | courses | faculty ]

1533 Mandler Hall
http://psychology.ucsd.edu

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

The Undergraduate Program

Major Programs

Psychology offers two degree programs: bachelor of arts (BA) and bachelor of science (BS). The department emphasizes research in the experimental and theoretical analysis of human and animal behavior, and the study of the mind. Students who major in psychology can expect to develop knowledge in a broad range of content areas, as well as basic skills in experimental and analytic procedures. The department offers courses in all major areas of experimental psychology, with emphases on behavior analysis, clinical psychology, cognitive psychology and cognitive neuropsychology, developmental psychology, neuroscience and behavior, sensation and perception, and social psychology. Once a student has decided upon a major in psychology, he or she is highly encouraged to consult with the Psychology Student Affairs Office to ensure full understanding of the major requirements.

Students majoring in psychology must have departmental approval for electives taken outside the department. We recommend consulting the Department of Psychology before enrolling in courses offered by other departments.

Lower-Division Course Requirements for the BA

Experimental psychology uses scientific tools and concepts: calculus, probability theory, computer science, chemistry, biology, physics, and statistics. Accordingly, students in upper-division courses must have an adequate background in these topics. Prerequisites for individual courses are specified in the catalog.

The lower-division requirements for the bachelor of arts in psychology are as follows:

  1. Three lower-division, general-introductory natural science courses from the listing of approved UC San Diego courses below or their equivalents. (The three courses can be distributed in any manner.)
    • Biology: 1, 2, 3, 10, 20, 24, 26
    • Chemistry: 4, 6A, 6B, 6C, 11, 12, 13
    • Physics: 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 10, 11
  2. Three formal skills courses, at least one of which must be calculus. The other two courses may consist of any combination of courses in calculus or logic.
    • Math: 10A, 10B, 10C; 20A, 20B, 20C
    • Philosophy: 10, 12
  3. One introduction to computer programming course.
    • Computer Science and Engineering: 3, 5A, 5B, 8A, 8B, 11, 12
    • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: 5, 8, 9, 10
    • Cognitive Science: 18

      Note: All courses listed under 1–3 may be taken Pass/Not Pass.

  4. One quarter of statistics.
    • Psychology: 60
    • Bioengineering: 100
    • Biological Sciences: 100
    • Cognitive Science: 14B
    • Economics: 120A
    • Mathematics: 11, 181, 183, 186
    • Sociology: 60

      Note: Statistics must be taken for a letter grade.

Students should complete these lower-division requirements by the end of the sophomore year.

Upper-Division Course Requirements for the BA

A minimum of twelve upper-division courses in psychology is required. Five must be taken from the core courses (Psychology 101–106), and at least seven from the upper-division elective courses (Psychology 107–193). A minimum of nine upper-division psychology courses must be taken at UC San Diego. These courses must be taken for a letter grade; courses taken as Pass/Not Pass cannot be used to satisfy the major requirement. Excluded from credit toward the major is Psychology 199 (Special Studies); however, Psychology 195 (Undergraduate Instructional Apprentice) can be credited once. Please see the department for more information regarding this option. Majors must obtain departmental approval for electives taken outside the department. A grade point average of at least 2.0 in the upper-division major courses is required for graduation.

Core Courses (take any five)

PSYC 101. Introduction to Developmental Psychology

PSYC 102. Introduction to Sensation and Perception

PSYC 103. Introduction to Principles of Behavior

PSYC 104. Introduction to Social Psychology

PSYC 105. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 106. Introduction to Physiological Psychology

Lower-Division Course Requirements for the BS

In general, the lower-division courses required for the BS in psychology overlap with the BA major. However, to fulfill the formal skills requirement, the mathematics sequence 20A-B-C is required for the BS.

The lower-division course requirements for the bachelor of science in psychology are as follows:

  1. Three lower-division, general-introductory natural science courses from the listing of approved UC San Diego courses below or their equivalents. (The three courses can be distributed in any manner.)
    • Biology: 1, 2, 3, 10, 20, 24, 26
    • Chemistry: 4, 6A, 6B, 6C, 11, 12, 13
    • Physics: 1A, 1B, 1C, 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 10, 11
  2. Three formal skills courses.
    • Math: 20A, 20B, 20C
  3. One introduction to computer programming course.
    • Computer Science and Engineering: 3, 5A, 5B, 8A, 8B, 11, 12
    • Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering: 5, 8, 9, 10
    • Cognitive Science: 18

      Note: All courses listed under 1–3 may be taken Pass/Not Pass.

  4. One quarter of statistics.
    • Psychology: 60
    • Bioengineering: 100
    • Biological Sciences: 100
    • Cognitive Science: 14B
    • Economics: 120A
    • Mathematics: 11, 181, 183, 186
    • Sociology: 60

      Note: Statistics must be taken for a letter grade.

Students should complete these lower-division requirements by the end of the sophomore year.

Upper-Division Course Requirements for the BS

A minimum of twelve upper-division courses is required. A minimum of nine upper-division psychology courses must be taken at UC San Diego. Five of these courses must come from the core courses (Psychology 101–106). The seven elective courses may be chosen from any of the upper-division courses listed for the psychology program at UC San Diego (Psychology 107–193). These courses must be taken for a letter grades; courses taken as Pass/Not Pass cannot be used to satisfy the major requirement. Psychology 195 (Undergraduate International Apprentice) can be credited once. Please see the department for more information regarding this option. Majors must obtain departmental approval for electives taken outside the department. A grade point average of at least 2.0 in the upper-division major courses is required for graduation. BS students must choose an area of concentration (behavior analysis, clinical psychology, cognitive psychology and cognitive neuropsychology, developmental psychology, neuroscience and behavior, sensation and perception, or social psychology), and three courses of the seven electives must be in the chosen area of concentration.

In addition to the twelve upper-division courses, all BS students must complete two courses to fulfill the research experience requirement. The research experience requirement may be fulfilled by passing two laboratory courses or Psychology 199 (Independent Study) courses or a combination thereof. If two Psychology 199 courses are taken to fulfill this requirement, it is recommended that they be directed by a faculty adviser within the chosen area of concentration. One of the two 199 courses must culminate in a research paper approved by the faculty adviser and submitted to the Psychology Student Affairs Office no later than Friday of tenth week of the graduating quarter.

Upper-Division Course Requirements for the BS

Core Courses (take any five)

PSYC 101. Introduction to Developmental Psychology

PSYC 102. Introduction to Sensation and Perception

PSYC 103. Introduction to Principles of Behavior

PSYC 104. Introduction to Social Psychology

PSYC 105. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 106. Introduction to Physiological Psychology

 

Areas of concentration and their associated courses are listed in alphabetical order below. (Subject to change—for additional qualifying courses, see the department’s website: http://psychology.ucsd.edu/undergraduate-program/degree-program/bs-concentrations/index.html).

Concentration in Behavior Analysis

Behavior analysis is based on the principles of Pavlovian and operant conditioning, and other aspects of contemporary associative learning theory. It also includes the application of reinforcement principles and other behavior modification techniques in applied settings (applied behavior analysis).

Courses

PSYC 109. Lab/Applied Behavior Analysis

PSYC 120. Learning and Motivation

PSYC 121. Laboratory in Operant Psychology*

PSYC 132. Hormones and Behavior

PSYC 134. Eating Disorders

PSYC 135. Animal Behavior

PSYC 140. Lab/Human Behavior*

PSYC 143. Control and Analysis of Human Behavior

PSYC 154. Behavior Modification

PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood

PSYC 171. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

PSYC 184. Choice and Self-Control

PSYC 188. Impulse Control Disorders

*to be taken concurrently with PSYC 120

Concentration in Clinical Psychology

The clinical psychology concentration involves the psychological and physiological causes of and treatments for mental illness in children and adults.

Courses

PSYC 107. Lab/Substance Abuse Research

PSYC 109. Lab/Applied Behavior Analysis

PSYC 124. Introduction to Clinical Psychology

PSYC 125. Clinical Neuropsychology and Assessment

PSYC 132. Hormones and Behavior

PSYC 133. Circadian Rhythms—Biological Clocks

PSYC 134. Eating Disorders

PSYC 151. Tests and Measurement

PSYC 154. Behavior Modification

PSYC 155. Social Psychology and Medicine

PSYC 163. Abnormal Psychology

PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood

PSYC 172. The Psychology of Human Sexuality

PSYC 184. Choice and Self-Control

PSYC 188. Impulse Control Disorders

PSYC 190. Parenting

Concentration in Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Neuropsychology

Cognition includes reasoning, thinking, language, judgment, and decision making in adults and children (including attention, memory, and visual and auditory information processing). Cognitive neuropsychology studies cognitive processes and their implementation in the brain. Cognitive neuroscientists use methods drawn from brain damage, neuropsychology, cognitive psychology, functional neuroimaging, and computer modeling.

Courses

PSYC 108. Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience

PSYC 114. Laboratory in Psychophysiological Perspectives on the Social Mind

PSYC 115. Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 119. Psycholinguistics/Cognition Laboratory

PSYC 128. Psychology of Reading

PSYC 129. Logic of Perception

PSYC 137. Social Cognition

PSYC 141. Evolution and Human Nature

PSYC 142. Psychology of Consciousness

PSYC 144. Memory and Amnesia

PSYC 145. Psychology of Language

PSYC 146. Language and Conceptual Development

PSYC 150. Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision

PSYC 152. Conceptions of Intelligence

PSYC 156. Cognitive Development in Infancy

PSYC 161. Introduction to Engineering Psychology

PSYC 170. Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology

PSYC 171. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

PSYC 187. Development of Social Cognition

PSYC 191. Psychology of Sleep

Concentration in Developmental Psychology

Developmental psychology entails all aspects of human development with emphases on social and personality development, perceptual development, and language acquisition. This concentration also includes the study of developmental psychopathology.

Courses

PSYC 109. Lab/Applied Behavior Analysis

PSYC 114. Laboratory in Psychophysiological Perspectives on the Social Mind

PSYC 133. Circadian Rhythms—Biological Clocks

PSYC 135. Animal Behavior

PSYC 136. Cognitive Development

PSYC 141. Evolution and Human Nature

PSYC 145. Psychology of Language

PSYC 152. Conceptions of Intelligence

PSYC 156. Cognitive Development in Infancy

PSYC 158. Interpersonal Relationships

PSYC 168. Psychological Disorders of Childhood

PSYC 172. The Psychology of Human Sexuality

PSYC 180. Adolescence

PSYC 187. Development of Social Cognition

PSYC 190. Parenting

Concentration in Neuroscience and Behavior

The concentration in neuroscience and behavior entails understanding how the nervous system mediates behavioral effects in the realms of motivation, perception, learning and memory, and attention. It also includes human neurophysiology and aphasia.

Courses

PSYC 107. Lab/Substance Abuse Research

PSYC 114. Laboratory in Psychophysiological Perspectives on the Social Mind

PSYC 125. Clinical Neuropsychology and Assessment

PSYC 129. Logic of Perception

PSYC 132. Hormones and Behavior

PSYC 133. Circadian Rhythms—Biological Clocks

PSYC 134. Eating Disorders

PSYC 135. Animal Behavior

PSYC 150. Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision

PSYC 159. Physiological Basis of Perception

PSYC 169. Brain Damage and Mental Functions

PSYC 170. Introduction to Cognitive Neuropsychology

PSYC 171. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory

PSYC 179. Drugs, Addiction, and Mental Disorders

PSYC 181. Drugs and Behavior

PSYC 188. Impulse Control Disorders

PSYC 189. Brain, Behavior, and Evolution

PSYC 190. Parenting

Concentration in Sensation and Perception

Sensation and perception is the study of how our sense organs and brain make it possible for us to construct our consciously experienced representation of the environment. Experiments using stimuli with computer control are used to test models of sensory or perceptual processes. Processes of particular interest include color vision, motion perception, and auditory illusions and paradoxes.

Courses

PSYC 125. Clinical Neuropsychology and Assessment

PSYC 128. Psychology of Reading

PSYC 129. Logic of Perception

PSYC 138. Sound and Music Perception

PSYC 150. Cognitive Neuroscience of Vision

PSYC 159. Physiological Basis of Perception

PSYC 169. Brain Damage and Mental Functions

PSYC 182. Illusions and the Brain

Concentration in Social Psychology

Social psychology is the study of human behavior in social situations. The concentration specializes in such topics as emotion, aggression, and social cognition. It also encompasses applied social psychology, including psychology and the law and behavioral medicine.

Courses

PSYC 114. Laboratory in Psychophysiological Perspectives on the Social Mind

PSYC 130. Delay of Gratification

PSYC 135. Animal Behavior

PSYC 137. Social Cognition

PSYC 139. Social Psychology of Sports

PSYC 141. Evolution and Human Nature

PSYC 152. Conceptions of Intelligence

PSYC 153. Psychology of Emotion

PSYC 155. Social Psychology and Medicine

PSYC 157. Happiness

PSYC 158. Interpersonal Relationships

PSYC 160. Groups

PSYC 162. Psychology and the Law

PSYC 172. The Psychology of Human Sexuality

PSYC 178. Industrial Organizational Psychology

PSYC 187. Development of Social Cognition

PSYC 190. Parenting

Honors Program

Students are encouraged to participate in the department’s honors program, which is strongly recommended for all students interested in graduate school. A minimum overall GPA of 3.3 (transfer GPA of 3.5 for transfer students) is a prerequisite. Admission is granted by application in the fall quarter of the junior year (Deadline: October 31). This program is composed of the following courses:

  1. Junior Year

    Winter:

    • Junior Honors Research Seminar (PSYC 110)
    • Advanced Statistics and Research Methods (PSYC 111A)

    Spring:

    • Advanced Statistics and Research Methods (PSYC 111B)
  2. Senior Year: A yearlong independent research project (PSYC 194-A-B-C) under the mentorship of a faculty adviser. This research culminates in an honors thesis and poster presentation during the spring quarter.
  3. For the BA with Honors—At least one laboratory course (Psychology 107, 109, 114, 115, 117, 119, 121, 140) or, one Psychology 199, Independent Study (199s, however, do not count as upper-division credit toward the major).
  4. For the BS with Honors—Because the BS already requires two research experiences, there is no additional laboratory requirement to participate in the Honors Program. PSYC 194 A-B-C fulfills one of the two research experiences required for the BS.

Successful completion of the Honors Program requires a grade of A– in the Psychology 194 series and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in the upper-division courses taken for the major.

Minor Program

The minor in psychology consists of seven four-unit courses from the Department of Psychology course offerings, of which at least twenty units (five four-unit courses) must be upper division. At least four upper-division courses must be taken at UC San Diego for a letter grade. Psychology 199 (Independent Study) may count for one upper-division course toward the minor.

If Psychology 60 (Statistics) is chosen as one of the lower-division courses, it must be taken for a letter grade. To declare or change your minor, use the minor tool on TritonLink. A grade point average of at least 2.0 is required for graduation.

Education Abroad

Students are often able to participate in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) and UC San Diego’s Opportunities Abroad Program (OAP) while still making progress toward the major. Students considering this option should discuss their plans with the Psychology Student Affairs Office before going abroad, and courses taken abroad must be approved by the Department of Psychology. Students may only receive credit for up to three upper-division psychology courses from their courses taken abroad. Information on EAP/OAP is detailed in the “Education Abroad Program” section of the UC San Diego General Catalog. Interested students should contact the Program Abroad Office in the International Center.

Transfer Credit

In general, all introductory courses in experimental psychology are accepted for lower-division credit toward a psychology minor. Upper-division psychology courses will be evaluated for transfer credit toward a psychology major or minor on a course-by-course basis.