International Studies

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School of Global Policy and Strategy
300 Robinson Building Complex, Bottom Floor
http://isp.ucsd.edu

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice.

The International Studies Program

Technology and the forces of cultural and economic integration are reducing the distances between societies. At the same time, ethnic, religious, and economic conflicts continue to erupt within and among societies. Both the proximity of other societies and the remaining divides within and among them demand a better understanding of their cultures and institutions. Societies cannot be understood in isolation or at a single point in time, however; they are shaped by global and regional environments—including their political, military, economic, and cultural interests—and their pasts. Individuals and societies in turn shape those environments as they reinterpret their histories.

The International Studies Program is multidisciplinary and builds on the strengths of existing international specializations at UC San Diego. International relations and comparative politics are established and distinguished fields of political science. Economic theory and methodologies are critical to an understanding of the global world. The comparative study of societies and their economies, markets, and cultures lies at the core of sociology, business, and anthropology. Literature and linguistics offer a rich array of courses concerned with languages and traditions outside English-speaking societies. And area studies programs provide comprehensive understanding of particular countries and regions.

The international studies major provides students with both a firm grounding in a discipline and the flexibility to permit exploration from alternative perspectives. The Disciplinary Focus and Interdisciplinary Electives chosen by each student contain the foundations of the major. International studies majors also complete two core courses (INTL 101: Culture and Society in International Perspective and INTL 102: Economics, Politics, and International Change) that serve as gateways to interdisciplinary approaches and to central international and comparative issues. Among the subjects considered are cultural boundaries and identities, economic and social development, international and regional integration and their effects, the evolution of political and social institutions, and forms of communication and language. A required capstone research seminar (INTL 190) permits the completion of a research paper in close association with a member of the faculty. Students who meet the qualifications have the opportunity to pursue honors through a two-quarter research sequence (INTL 190H and INTL 196H). International studies majors benefit throughout from the activities and programs of the School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS), the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies (CILAS), and many other departments and research centers on campus.

Education Abroad

Majors in international studies are encouraged to participate in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) and UC San Diego’s Opportunities Abroad Program (OAP). Subject to approval by the faculty director of the major, up to four courses taken through EAP/OAP will be accepted for credit toward the major. Students are strongly encouraged to complete INTL 101 and INTL 102 before departure. Students interested in studying abroad should see an International Studies Program adviser to discuss appropriate courses and programs for their plan of study. Information on EAP/OAP is given in the Education Abroad Program section of the UC San Diego General Catalog. Interested students should contact the Study Abroad UC San Diego Office and visit its website at http://studyabroad.ucsd.edu. Financial aid can be used for EAP/OAP study. Special study abroad scholarships are also available.

For information on study abroad at ISP, visit http://isp.ucsd.edu and http://studyabroad.ucsd.edu.

Careers

The International Studies Program attracts students who are interested in a variety of careers, including government and international organizations, international business, nongovernmental organizations, journalism, education, the arts, and the media. Because of its strong disciplinary core, the major also prepares students who wish to pursue graduate degree programs in international affairs or in one of the participating disciplines.

Honors

The Honors Program in International Studies recognizes academic excellence in the major. The Honors Program allows qualified students to complete an honors thesis on a topic of their choice in close collaboration with a member of the UC San Diego faculty. Students who wish to participate in the Honors Program in International Studies should indicate their interest in the spring quarter of their junior year. Honors program applications are available on the ISP website. Applications are due by Monday of the ninth week, the quarter before you enroll in INTL 190H.

Refer to http://isp.ucsd.edu/programs/honors-program/index.html for additional requirements and information pertaining to the ISP Honors Program.

Requirements for the Honors Program

Candidates for honors in any of the international studies degrees must meet the following requirements:

Criteria for Distinction, High Distinction, and Highest Distinction

Please refer to the International Studies Program website for additional requirements.

The International Studies Major

A student who satisfactorily completes the general-education requirements of Muir, Revelle, Marshall, Warren, Roosevelt, or Sixth College in addition to the international studies requirements described below will be awarded one of the following bachelor of arts degrees based upon selection of the Disciplinary Focus:

International Studies—Anthropology

International Studies—Economics

International Studies—History

International Studies—International Business

International Studies—Linguistics

International Studies—Literature

International Studies—Philosophy

International Studies—Political Science

International Studies—Sociology

All upper-division courses applied to the requirements of the major must be taken for a letter grade. A 2.0 grade point average is required in the major, and students must earn at least a C– in each course counted for the major. Transfer students should see the International Studies Program adviser to determine whether courses taken elsewhere satisfy international studies major requirements.

Lower-Division Requirements

Foreign language (four quarters of college-level language or equivalent proficiency).

Students majoring in international studies are required to demonstrate basic proficiency in a foreign language by completing four quarters of foreign language instruction (or the equivalent of fourth-quarter proficiency) with a passing grade. Students may also complete this requirement by demonstrating advanced language ability on a proficiency exam or by proof of native ability.

College-level language study is a prerequisite for study abroad in most non-English speaking countries and enhances understanding of those societies. Students who plan to study abroad in non-English speaking countries may need to take additional language classes, and they will need to take all language courses for a letter grade.

Students should make substantial progress toward fulfilling college general-education requirements and the foreign language requirement of the international studies major before beginning the core sequence of the international studies major.

Upper-Division Requirements

The upper-division requirements for a major in international studies are

  1. Two core courses (INTL 101 and INTL 102)
  2. A capstone seminar (INTL 190)
  3. Eight 4-unit, upper-division, nonlanguage courses in a Disciplinary Focus
  4. Three 4-unit, upper-division, nonlanguage courses chosen from the ISP Interdisciplinary Elective list. (Courses may not be from Disciplinary Focus department.)
  5. Regional Requirement: Three of the eleven courses taken for the Disciplinary Focus and Interdisciplinary Electives must focus on one country or region.

Core Courses

Two core courses (INTL 101 and INTL 102) provide an intellectual gateway to central issues and disciplinary approaches in international studies. Students may begin the sequence with either course. At least one quarter of university-level writing and sophomore status are prerequisites for both courses. Students must complete both INTL 101 and INTL 102 with a passing grade of C– or better before enrolling in INTL 190.

INTL 101. Culture and Society in International Perspective (4)

INTL 102. Economics, Politics, and International Change (4)

Capstone Seminar

All majors will complete the capstone seminar during their senior year. Students are required to complete a research paper for this course. Prerequisites: Successful completion with a C– or better of both INTL 101 and INTL 102.

INTL 190. Seminar in International Studies (4)

Regional Requirement

Of the eleven Disciplinary Focus and Interdisciplinary Elective courses (eight Disciplinary Focus and three Interdisciplinary Electives), three courses must concentrate on one country or region outside the United States to complete the International Studies Program regional requirement.

Departments Offering a Disciplinary Focus

Anthropology

Disciplinary Focus: Students are required to take at least one course from the following:

ANTH 101. Foundations of Social Complexity

ANTH 102. Humans are Cultural Animals

ANTH 103. Sociocultural Anthropology

The remaining upper-division courses should be selected from the Anthropology: Sociocultural (ANSC) and Archaeology (ANAR) listings. Up to two approved courses from Anthropology: Biological (ANBI) may also be counted toward the major with the approval of the International Studies Program adviser.

Economics

Disciplinary Focus: IS majors must satisfy the following six lower-division department requirements with a C– or better:

Calculus. MATH 10A-B-C or MATH 20A-B-C and ECON 1, 2, 3

Upper-division courses may be selected from

ECON 100A-B-C. Microeconomics

ECON 110A-B. Macroeconomics

ECON 120A-B-C. Econometrics

ECON 101. International Trade

ECON 102. Globalization

ECON 103. International Monetary Relations

ECON 106. International Economics Agreements

ECON 116. Economic Development

ECON 117. Economic Growth

ECON 125. Demographic Analysis and Forecasting

ECON 131. Economics of the Environment

ECON 132. Energy Economics

ECON 144. Economics of Conservation

ECON 145. Economics of Ocean Resources

ECON 162. Economics of Mexico

ECON 165. Middle East Economics

ISP Economics Disciplinary Focus students must take Economics 101 or Economics 102 or Economics 103 or Economics 116 and at least one of the following:

ECON 101. International Trade

ECON 102. Globalization

ECON 103. International Monetary Relations

ECON 116. Economic Development

ECON 117. Economic Growth

ECON 125. Demographic Analysis and Forecasting

ECON 131. Economics of the Environment

ECON 132. Energy Economics

ECON 144. Economics of Conservation

ECON 145. Economics of Ocean Resources

ECON 162. Economics of Mexico

ECON 165. Middle East Economics

History

Disciplinary Focus: At least six of eight courses must be taken in any of the following categories:

History of Africa (HIAF)

History of Europe (HIEU)

History of East Asia (HIEA)

History of the Near East (HINE)

History of Latin America (HILA)

History of Science (HISC)

History Topics (HITO), except HITO 194–199

Up to two courses may be taken in History of the United States (HIUS).

International Business

Note: Students majoring in IS international business may not complete the Rady School of Management minors in business, entrepreneurship and innovation, and/or supply chain. IS international business majors may declare the Rady minor in accounting.

Disciplinary Focus: IS majors must satisfy the following five lower-division requirements with a C– or better:

Calculus. MATH 10A-B-C or MATH 20A-B-C

MGT/ECON 4. Financial Accounting

MGT 5. Managerial Accounting

The following five upper-division courses are required:

MGT 103. Product Marketing and Management

MGT 112. Global Business Strategy

MGT 164. Organizational Leadership

MGT 181. Enterprise Finance OR MGT 187: New Venture Finance

MGT 166. Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility

At least three electives from the following are required:

MGT 105. Product Promotion and Brand Management

MGT 106. Sales and Sales Management

MGT 121A. Innovation to Market (A)

MGT 121B. Innovation to Market (B)

MGT 127. Innovation and Technology Strategy

MGT 128/128R. Innovation in Service Enterprises

MGT 167. Social Entrepreneurship

MGT 183. Financial Investments

MGT 184. Money and Banking

MGT 185. Investment Banking

MGT 171. Operations Management

MGT 172. Business Project Management

MGT 173. Project Management: Health Services

MGT 175. Supply Chain Management

MGT 131A. Intermediate Accounting A

MGT 133B. Intermediate Accounting B

MGT 132. Auditing

MGT 133. Advanced Cost Accounting

MGT 134.Federal Taxations–Individuals

MGT 135. Federal Taxations–Corporations

MGT 136. Advanced Accounting

MGT 139. Accounting Information Systems

Linguistics

Disciplinary Focus: Eight upper-division courses in linguistics, which must include LIGN 101 (Introduction to the Study of Language) and at least three courses from the following list:

LIGN 105. Law and Language

LIGN 108. Languages of Africa

LIGN 141. Language Structures

LIGN 143. Structure of Spanish

LIGN 150. Historical Linguistics

LIGN 152. Indigenous Languages of the Americas

LIGN 155. Evolution of Language

LIGN 174. Gender and Language in Society

LIGN 175. Sociolinguistics

LIGN 176. Language of Politics and Advertising

LIGN 177. Multilingualism

At most, one of the eight courses can be LIGN 199 (Independent Study in Linguistics) by petition. Students may not use LIGN 195 toward major requirements.

Literature

Disciplinary Focus: Eight upper-division courses selected from the following:

Literatures in English (LTEN)

LTEN 188. Contemporary Caribbean Literature

LTEN 189. Twentieth-Century Postcolonial Literatures

Literatures of the World (LTWL)

LTWL 140. Novel and History in the Third World

LTWL 143. Arab Literatures and Cultures

LTWL 144. Islam and Cinema

LTWL 150. Modernity and Literature

LTWL 157. Iranian Film

LTWL 168. Death and Desire in India

Literatures of the Americas (LTAM)

LTAM 110. Latin American Literature in Translation

LTAM 111. Comparative Caribbean Discourse

LTAM 130. Reading North by South

Literature/Cultural Studies (LTCS)

LTCS 133. Globalization and Culture

LTCS 141. Special Topics in Race and Empire

And all courses listed under

African Literatures (LTAF)

Literatures in Chinese (LTCH)

East Asian Literatures (LTEA)

European and Eurasian Literature (LTEU)

Literatures in French (LTFR)

Literatures in German (LTGM)

Greek Literature (LTGK)

Literatures in Italian (LTIT)

Korean Literature (LTKO)

Latin Literature (LTLA)

Russian Literature (LTRU) with exception of LTRU 104A, B, C

Literatures in Spanish (LTSP) with exception of LTSP 151, 154, 160, 162, 166

With approval of the undergraduate adviser, students may take up to two theory or methods courses selected from Literature/Theory (LTTH) courses LTTH 110, LTTH 115, or LTTH 150, and from among the Literature/Cultural Studies (LTCS) courses LTCS 100, LTCS 102, or LTCS 120.

Philosophy

Disciplinary Focus: IS majors must satisfy the following lower-division department requirement with a C– or better.

PHIL 10. Introduction to Logic

Eight upper-division disciplinary focuses courses, with at least two (2) each from course cluster A and B, and one (1) from course cluster C. The remaining three courses will be at the student’s discretion.

Cluster A: History of Philosophy—at least two courses.

PHIL 100. Plato

PHIL 101. Aristotle

PHIL 102. Hellenistic Philosophy

PHIL 104. The Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz)

PHIL 105. The Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley, Hume)

PHIL 106. Kant

PHIL 107. Hegel

PHIL 108. Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (Schopenhauer, Marx, Nietzsche)

PHIL 109. History of Analytic Philosophy (Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Carnap)

PHIL 110. History of Philosophy: Ancient (Plato, Aristotle)

PHIL 111. History of Philosophy: Early Modern (Descartes, Locke, Hume)

PHIL 112. History of Philosophy: Late Modern (Kant, Hegel)

PHIL 155. Mexican Philosophy

PHIL 156. Topics in Asian Philosophy

PHIL 161. Topics in the History of Ethics (Confucius, Aristotle, Mill)

PHIL 166. Classics in Political Philosophy (Plato, Marx, Arendt)

PHIL 180. Phenomenology (Brentano, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty)

PHIL 181. Existentialism (Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, De Beauvoir)

PHIL 183. Topics in Continental Philosophy (Frankfurt School, contemporary French)

Cluster B: Philosophical Topics in Contemporary International Studies—at least two courses.

PHIL 134. Philosophy of Language

PHIL 139. Global Justice

PHIL 148. Philosophy and the Environment

PHIL 152. Philosophy of Social Science

PHIL 160. Ethical Theory

PHIL 162. Contemporary Moral Issues

PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics

PHIL 164. Technology and Human Values

PHIL 165. Freedom, Equality, and the Law

PHIL 167. Contemporary Political Philosophy

PHIL 168. Philosophy of Law

PHIL 170. Philosophy and Race

PHIL 173. Topics in Bioethics

Cluster C: Logic Requirement—at least one course.

PHIL 120. Symbolic Logic I

PHIL 122. Advanced Topics in Logic

PHIL 123. Philosophy of Logic

Political Science

Disciplinary Focus: Eight courses selected from the following. All courses numbered POLI 120 through POLI 159:

Comparative Politics: POLI 120B through POLI 134I and POLI 136A through POLI 138D

International Relations: POLI 140A through POLI 142J and POLI 142L through POLI 154

Up to three courses may be from the following subfields:

American Politics: POLI 100A through POLI 108

Political Theory: POLI 110A through POLI 112C and POLI 114C through POLI 119A

Policy Analysis: POLI 160AA through POLI 168

Research Methods: POLI 170A and POLI 181

Sociology

Disciplinary Focus: Eight upper-division courses selected from the following list:

SOCI 106M. Holocaust Diaries

SOCI 121. Economy and Society

SOCI 123. Japanese Culture Inside/Out: A Transnational Perspective

SOCI 125. Sociology of Immigration

SOCI 133. Immigration in Comparative Perspective

SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine

SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach

SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society

SOCI 148. Political Sociology

SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy

SOCI 156. Sociology of Religion

SOCI 157. Religion in Contemporary Society

SOCI 158. Islam in the Modern World

SOCI 163. Migration and the Law

SOCI 169. Citizenship, Community, and Culture

SOCI 175. Nationality and Citizenship

SOCI 176. Transnational Japan Research

SOCI 177. International Terrorism

SOCI 178. The Holocaust

SOCI 179. Social Change

SOCI 180. Social Movements and Social Protest

SOCI 181. Modern Western Society

SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development

SOCI 187. African Societies through Films

SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics

SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa

SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society

SOCI 188G. Chinese Society

SOCI 188I. The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

SOCI 188J. Change in Modern South Africa

SOCI 188M. Social Movements in Latin America

SOCI 188O. Settlements and Peacemaking in Israel

SOCI 189. Special Topics in Comparative-Historical Sociology

Note: Following the completion of one SOCI 189 course, all subsequent enrollments for a SOCI 189 must be approved by an adviser in international studies.

Interdisciplinary Electives Course List

Students must choose three Interdisciplinary Elective courses. These must be upper-division, four-unit, nonlanguage courses. Students are responsible for meeting all departmental prerequisites for any course.

Anthropology

ANTH 101. Foundations of Social Complexity

ANTH 102. Humans are Cultural Animals

ANTH 103. Sociocultural Anthropology

You may also choose any four-unit, upper-division, nonlanguage course from the following categories:

Anthropology: Sociocultural (ANSC)

Archaeology (ANAR)

Communication

COMM 104D. Comparative Media Systems: Asia

COMM 104E. Comparative Media Systems: Europe

COMM 104F. Comparative Media Systems: Africa

COMM 104G. Comparative Media Systems: Latin America and the Caribbean

COMM 106G. Cultural Industries: Tourism: Global Industry and Cultural Form

COMM 112G. Interaction and Mediation: Language and Globalization

COMM 114E. Communication and Social Institutions: Gender, Labor, and Culture in the Global Economy

COMM 114J. CSI: Food Justice

COMM 128. Education and Global Citizenship

COMM 131. Communication, Dissent, and the Formation of Social Movements

COMM 135. Contemporary Minority Media Makers and the Festival Experience

COMM 138. Black Women, Feminism, and Media

COMM 140. Cinema in Latin America

COMM 152. Global Economy and Consumer Culture

COMM 155. Latino Space, Place, and Culture

COMM 158. Representations of the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

COMM 160. Political Economy and International Communication

COMM 168. Bilingual Communication

COMM 177. Culture, Domination, and Resistance

COMM 179. Global Nature/Global Culture

COMM 181. Neoliberal Cities

COMM 183. Global Economy and Consumer Culture

Economics

ECON 101. International Trade

ECON 102. Globalization

ECON 103. International Monetary Relations

ECON 106. International Economics Agreements

ECON 114. Economics of Immigration

ECON 116. Economic Development

ECON 117. Economic Growth

ECON 125. Demographic Analysis and Forecasting

ECON 131. Economics of the Environment

ECON 132. Energy Economics

ECON 133. International Environmental Agreements

ECON 144. Economics of Conservation

ECON 145. Economics of Ocean Resources

ECON 161. Global Integration of Latin America

ECON 162. Economics of Mexico

ECON 165. Middle East Economics

Global Health

GLBH 105. Global Health and Inequality

GLBH 110. Demography and Social Networks in Global Health

GLBH 113. Women’s Health in Global Perspective

GLBH 147. Global Health and the Environment

GLBH 148. Global Health and Cultural Diversity

GLBH 150. Culture and Mental Health

History

Any four-unit, upper-division, nonlanguage course from the following categories:

History of Africa (HIAF)

History of Europe (HIEU)

History of East Asia (HIEA)

History of the Near East (HINE)

History of Latin America (HILA)

History of Science (HISC)

History Topics (HITO), except HITO 194–199

Jewish Studies

JWSP 101. Introduction to Hebrew Texts

JWSP 102. Intermediate Hebrew Texts

JWSP 103. Advanced Hebrew Texts

JWSP 104. Practicum in Advanced Hebrew Language and Texts

JWSP 110. Introduction to Judaism

JWSP 111. Topics in Judaic Studies

Latin American Studies

LATI 180. Special Topics in Latin American Studies

Linguistics

LIGN 105. Law and Language

LIGN 108. Languages of Africa

LIGN 141. Language Structures

LIGN 143. Structure of Spanish

LIGN 150. Historical Linguistics

LIGN 152. Indigenous Languages of the Americas

LIGN 155. Evolution of Language

LIGN 174. Gender and Language in Society

LIGN 175. Sociolinguistics

LIGN 176. Language of Politics and Advertising

LIGN 177. Multilingualism

Literature

Literatures in English (LTEN)

LTEN 188. Contemporary Caribbean Literature

LTEN 189. Twentieth-Century Postcolonial Literatures

Literatures of the World (LTWL)

LTWL 140. Novel and History in the Third World

LTWL 143. Arab Literatures and Cultures

LTWL 144. Islam and Cinema

LTWL 150. Modernity and Literature

LTWL 157. Iranian Film

LTWL 168. Death and Desire in India

Literatures of the Americas (LTAM)

LTAM 110. Latin American Literature in Translation

LTAM 111. Comparative Caribbean Discourse

LTAM 130. Reading North by South

Literature/Cultural Studies (LTCS)

LTCS 133. Globalization and Culture

LTCS 141. Special Topics in Race and Empire

You may also choose any four-unit, upper-division, nonlanguage course from the following categories:

African Literatures (LTAF)

Literatures in Chinese (LTCH)

East Asian Literatures (LTEA)

European and Eurasian Literature (LTEU)

Literatures in French (LTFR)

Literatures in German (LTGM)

Greek Literature (LTGK)

Literatures in Italian (LTIT) with exception of LTIT 161

Korean Literature (LTKO)

Latin Literature (LTLA)

Russian Literature (LTRU) with exception of LTRU 104A, B, C

Literatures in Spanish (LTSP) with exception of LTSP 151, 154, 160, 162, 166

Music

MUS 111. Topics/World Music Traditions (ONLY when not on the U.S.)

Philosophy

PHIL 100. Plato

PHIL 101. Aristotle

PHIL 102. Hellenistic Philosophy

PHIL 104. The Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz)

PHIL 105. The Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley, Hume)

PHIL 106. Kant

PHIL 107. Hegel

PHIL 108. Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (Schopenhauer, Marx, Nietzsche)

PHIL 109. History of Analytic Philosophy (Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Carnap)

PHIL 110. History of Philosophy: Ancient (Plato, Aristotle)

PHIL 111. History of Philosophy: Early Modern (Descartes, Locke, Hume)

PHIL 112. History of Philosophy: Late Modern (Kant, Hegel)

PHIL 120. Symbolic Logic I

PHIL 122. Advanced Topics in Logic

PHIL 123. Philosophy of Logic

PHIL 134. Philosophy of Language

PHIL 139. Global Justice

PHIL 148. Philosophy and the Environment

PHIL 152. Philosophy of Social Science

PHIL 155. Mexican Philosophy

PHIL 156. Topics in Asian Philosophy

PHIL 160. Ethical Theory

PHIL 161. Topics in the History of Ethics (Confucius, Aristotle, Mill)

PHIL 162. Contemporary Moral Issues

PHIL 163. Biomedical Ethics

PHIL 164. Technology and Human Values

PHIL 165. Freedom, Equality, and the Law

PHIL 166. Classics in Political Philosophy (Plato, Marx, Arendt)

PHIL 167. Contemporary Political Philosophy

PHIL 168. Philosophy of Law

PHIL 170. Philosophy and Race

PHIL 173. Topics in Bioethics

PHIL 180. Phenomenology (Brentano, Husserl, Merleau-Ponty)

PHIL 181. Existentialism (Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, de Beauvoir)

PHIL 183. Topics in Continental Philosophy (Frankfurt School, contemporary French)

Political Science

Comparative Politics: POLI 120B through POLI 134I and POLI 136A through POLI 138D

International Relations: POLI 140A through POLI 142J and POLI 142L through POLI 154

Religion

RELI 146. Topics in the Religions of Antiquity

RELI 147. Pagan Europe and Its Christian Aftermath

Sociology

SOCI 106M. Holocaust Diaries

SOCI 121.Economy and Society

SOCI 123. Japanese Culture Inside/Out: A Transnational Perspective

SOCI 125. Sociology of Immigration

SOCI 133. Immigration in Comparative Perspective

SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine

SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach

SOCI 136F. Sociology of Mental Illness in Contemporary Society

SOCI 148. Political Sociology

SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy

SOCI 156. Sociology of Religion

SOCI 157. Religion in Contemporary Society

SOCI 158. Islam in the Modern World

SOCI 163. Migration and the Law

SOCI 169. Citizenship, Community, and Culture

SOCI 175. Nationality and Citizenship

SOCI 176. Transnational Japan Research

SOCI 177. International Terrorism

SOCI 178. The Holocaust

SOCI 179. Social Change

SOCI 180. Social Movements and Social Protest

SOCI 181. Modern Western Society

SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development

SOCI 187. African Societies through Films

SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics

SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa

SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society

SOCI 188G. Chinese Society

SOCI 188I. The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

SOCI 188J. Change in Modern South Africa

SOCI 188M. Social Movements in Latin America

SOCI 188O. Settlements and Peacemaking in Israel

SOCI 189. Special Topics in Comparative-Historical Sociology

Note: SOCI 189 must be preapproved by program adviser.

Urban Studies and Planning

USP 129. Research Methods: Studying Racial and Ethnic Communities

USP 133. Social Inequality and Public Policy

USP 135. Asian and Latina Immigrant Workers in the Global Economy

USP 154. Global Justice in Theory and Action

USP 155. Real Estate Development in Global and Comparative Perspective

USP 173. History of Urban Planning and Design

Visual Arts

VIS 102. Cross-Border Urbanizations

VIS 105D. Art Forms and Chinese Calligraphy

VIS 117I. Western and Non-Western Rituals and Ceremonies

VIS 120A. Greek Art

VIS 120B. Roman Art

VIS 121B. Church and Mosque: Medieval Art and Architecture between Christianity and Islam

VIS 121H. Medieval Multiculturalism

VIS 122AN. Renaissance Art

VIS 122CN. Leonardo da Vinci in Context

VIS 122D. Michelangelo

VIS 123AN. Between Spirit and Flesh

VIS 124D. Paris, Capital of the Nineteenth Century

VIS 125C. Modern Art in the West, 1850–1950

VIS 126AN. Pre-Columbian Art of the Ancient Mexico and Central America

VIS 126BN. Art and Civilization of the Ancient Maya

VIS 126C. Problems in Meso-American Art History

VIS 126D. Problems in Ancient Maya Iconography and Inscriptions

VIS 126J. African and Afro-American Art

VIS 126K. Oceanic Art

VIS 126P. Latin American Art: Modern to Postmodern 1890–1950

VIS 126Q. Latin American Art: Modern to Postmodern 1950–Present

VIS 127A. Contemporary Arts in South Korea

VIS 127B. Arts of China

VIS 127C. Arts of Modern China

VIS 127D. Early Chinese Painting

VIS 127E. Later Chinese Painting

VIS 127F. Japanese Buddhist Art

VIS 127I. Architecture and Urbanism of Korea

VIS 127N. Twentieth-Century Art in China and Japan

VIS 127P. Arts of Japan

VIS 127Q. Japanese Painting and Prints

VIS 128D. Topics in Art History of the Americas

VIS 128E. Topics in Art History of Asia

VIS 152. Film in the Social Context (when International in content)

VIS 156. Latino American Cinema

Bachelor of Arts/Master of International Affairs (BA/MIA)

The International Studies Program and the School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS) have collaborated to create a contiguous Bachelor of Arts/Master of International Affairs Program (BA/MIA). The program is designed specifically for selected UC San Diego undergraduate majors in international studies who seek advanced training for leadership positions in the Pacific Rim community. In addition to serving the needs of UC San Diego undergraduate students, the program creates a societal benefit by providing students with advanced training that is suitable for a wide array of careers in government, industry, nonprofit institutions, and other organizations involved in the international affairs of the Pacific Rim.

The BA/MIA Program retains and builds on the interdisciplinary core of the existing international studies degree and adds to it the professional training of a one-year Master of International Affairs professional degree (final year of the program). This program permits undergraduates to incorporate graduate-level courses into their senior year of the international studies major. The degree provides an interdisciplinary program of study in the international studies major during the first four years. It is expected that up to twenty undergraduate students will be accepted into this program each year. Some students may take longer to complete the BA/MIA if they enter UC San Diego as transfers or opt to study abroad for a year.

The structure of the program is as follows:

Freshman to Junior Year

Undergraduate lower- and upper-division course work; general-education, language courses, INTL courses, major prerequisites, and half the undergraduate track courses. Application to the BA/MIA Program is made in the spring of a student’s junior year.

Senior Year

Students are still undergraduates, but the majority of course work is completed at GPS at the graduate level; at the end of the senior year, students graduate with a BA in international studies.

Summer

Required summer internship between undergraduate graduation and matriculation to graduate student status.

Final Year—Graduate Status

Students matriculate into the School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS) as graduate students and complete remaining graduate course work. Upon successful completion, they graduate with a master’s of international affairs degree (MIA) at end of year five.

Note: The undergraduate requirements for this program are different from those for the standard ISP major. The BA/MIA Program requires students to have a Primary Track (eight courses) and Secondary Track (five). This program is only open to students whose Primary Track is in economics, international business, or political science. The Secondary Track for each, respectively, is political science, political science, and economics.

Students apply to the program in spring quarter of their junior year. Acceptance is provisional until successful completion of the senior year and the required summer internship. Admission requires the completion of all lower division course work for the major. In the final year, the student is officially accepted into the MIA program and begins to pay professional fees.

The BA/MIA Program is much more rigidly structured than the regular IS major. Students will need to meet frequently with the International Studies Program academic adviser from their first year onward to ensure proper course selection each quarter. Once admitted to the BA/MIA Program, students should also meet with the academic advisers at GPS.

The approved course list for the BA/MIA Program is different from the list for the regular IS major. Please be sure to consult the appropriate list to find approved courses.

Students must study a Pacific Rim foreign language for this program because the language must match the GPS region of specialization during the fifth year. Consult the ISP website for a complete list of approved BA/MIA languages and their corresponding GPS regions.

Students must complete a minimum of four quarters of a Pacific Rim foreign language in order to meet the BA requirement. Two additional quarters are required for the MIA It is recommended (but not required) that students complete all six quarters at the undergraduate level.

Students choosing to satisfy their language requirement by taking six quarters of course work as undergraduates must earn a grade of C– or better. If they take their final quarter of language after matriculating to graduate standing, students must earn a grade of B or better in their sixth quarter of language.

For additional information about the BA/MIA Program, please visit our website at http://isp.ucsd.edu. For application information and admissions criteria, please visit https://gps.ucsd.edu/academics/ba-mia.html.

The International Studies Minor

The international studies minor is designed to offer students an introduction to the interdisciplinary investigation of other societies and the forces of global integration and conflict. To receive a minor in international studies, a student must complete seven four-unit courses (twenty-eight units).

(A) Language requirement

ALL minors must demonstrate basic proficiency in a modern foreign language by completing four quarters of foreign language instruction (or equivalent). Students may also complete this requirement by demonstrating advanced language ability on a proficiency exam. Students completing the language requirement through waiver (700 or better on SAT II language exam or if you attended high school outside the U.S.) or proficiency will fulfill the language component of the minor by completing one of these requirements, but no course credit will be applied toward the seven courses required for the minor.

Up to two courses in foreign language can be included in the seven courses required for the minor. These may be lower-division courses but must be taken for a C– or better to apply. The remaining five courses must be upper-division courses in the humanities and social sciences. (See below.)

(B) Additional course requirements

  1. All minors must take INTL 101 and INTL 102. INTL 101 and INTL 102 may be taken in any order and are offered during different quarters throughout each academic year. INTL 101 and 102 are gateway courses and should be taken in the sophomore or junior year.
  2. The remaining three to five courses (depending on the number of language courses applied to the minor) must be distributed in two broad tracks. Students must take at least one course in each of two tracks:

    Track 1. Economics, Politics, and International Change

    Track 2. Culture and Society in International Perspective

    (See course listings for each track.)

  3. The minor must include courses from at least two departments.
  4. All courses applied to the minor (including applicable language courses) must receive a letter grade of C– or better.
  5. Minors in international studies are encouraged to participate in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) and UC San Diego’s Opportunities Abroad Program (OAP). Subject to approval by the IS faculty director, up to three courses taken through EAP/OAP or at another university will be accepted for credit toward the minor.

TRACKS IN THE INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MINOR

Track 1: Economics, Politics, and International Change
Communication

COMM 114E. Communication and Social Institutions: Gender, Labor, and Culture in the Global Economy

COMM 131. Communication, Dissent, and the Formation of Social Movements

COMM 152. Global Economy and Consumer Culture

COMM 160. Political Economy and International Communication

COMM 183. Global Economy and Consumer Culture

Economics

ECON 101. International Trade

ECON 102. Globalization

ECON 103. International Monetary Relations

ECON 116. Economic Development

ECON 117. Economic Growth

ECON 125. Demographic Analysis and Forecasting

ECON 131. Economics of the Environment

ECON 132. Energy Economics

ECON 144. Economics of Conservation

ECON 145. Economics of Ocean Resources

ECON 162. Economics of Mexico

ECON 165. Middle East Economics

History

HIAF 111. Modern Africa Since 1880

HIAF 112. West Africa Since 1880

HIAF 113. Small Wars and the Global Order: Africa and Asia

HIAF 120. History of South Africa

HIAF 123. West Africa from Earliest of Times to 1800

HIEA 111. Japan: Twelfth to Mid-Nineteenth Centuries

HIEA 112. Japan: From the Mid-Nineteenth Century through the US Occupation

HIEA 113. The Fifteen-Year War in Asia and the Pacific

HIEA 114. Postwar Japan

HIEA 116. Japan-U.S. Relations

HIEA 131. China in War and Revolution: 1911–1949

HIEA 132. Mao’s China, 1949–1976

HIEA 150. Modern Korea, 1800–1945

HIEA 151. The Two Koreas, 1945–Present

HIEU 102. Roman History

HIEU 102A. Ancient Roman Civilization

HIEU 103. Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

HIEU 104. Byzantine Empire

HIEU 117A. Greece and the Balkans in the Age of Nationalism

HIEU 117B. Greece and the Balkans during the Twentieth Century

HIEU 119. Modern Italy: From Unification to the Present

HIEU 124GS. The City Italy

HIEU 128. Europe Since 1945

HIEU 131. The French Revolution: 1789–1814

HIEU 132. Germany from Luther to Bismarck

HIEU 134. The Formation of the Russian Empire, 800–1855

HIEU 136B. European Society and Social Thought, 1870–1989

HIEU 137. History of Colonialism: From New Imperialism to Decolonization

HIEU 141. European Diplomatic History, 1870–1945

HIEU 146. Fascism, Communism, and the Crisis of Liberal Democracy: Europe 1919–1945

HIEU 150. Modern British History

HIEU 151. Spain Since 1808

HIEU 151GS. History of Modern Spain, 1808–Present

HIEU 153A. Nineteenth-Century France

HIEU 154. Modern German History: From Bismarck to Hitler

HIEU 156. History of the Soviet Union, 1905–1991

HIEU 157. Religion and the Law in Modern European History

HIEU 158. Why Hitler? How Auschwitz?

HIEU 159. Three Centuries of Zionism from 1648–1948

HIEU 181. Immigration, Ethnicity, and Identity in Contemporary European Society

HIEU 182. The Muslim Experience in Contemporary Europe

HILA 100. Conquest and Empire: The Americas  

HILA 101. Nation-State Formation, Ethnicity, and Violence in Latin America

HILA 102. Latin America in the Twentieth Century

HILA 103. Revolution in Modern Latin America

HILA 113D. Lord and Peasant in Latin America

HILA 114. Dictatorships in Latin America

HILA 120. History of Argentina

HILA 121A. History of Brazil through 1889

HILA 121B. History of Brazil, 1889 to Present

HILA 122. Cuba: From Colony to Socialist Republic

HILA 131. A History of Mexico

HILA 132. Modern Mexico: From Revolution to Drug War Violence

HILA 161. History of Women in Latin America

HINE 114. History of the Islamic Middle East

HINE 116. The Middle East in the Age of European Empires (1798–1914)

HINE 118. The Middle East in the Twentieth Century

HINE 126. Iranian Revolution in Historical Perspective

HINE 127. History of Modern Turkey

HINE 166. Nationalism in the Middle East

HITO 117. World History. 1200–1800

HITO 133. War and Society: The Second World War

HITO 134. International Law—War Crimes and Genocide

Linguistics

LIGN 105. Law and Language

LIGN 108. Languages of Africa

LIGN 174. Gender and Language in Society

LIGN 177. Multilingualism

Political Science

Comparative Politics: POLI 120B through POLI 134I and POLI 136A through POLI 138D

International Relations: POLI 140A through POLI 142J and POLI 142L through POLI 154

Track 2: Culture and Society in International Perspective
Anthropology

ANSC 105. Global Health and Inequality

ANSC 110. Societies and Cultures of the Caribbean

ANSC 111. The Chinese Heritage in Taiwan

ANSC 114. Food Cultures in South America

ANSC 130. Hinduism

ANSC 131. Language, Law, and Social Justice

ANSC 135. Indigenous Peoples of Latin America

ANSC 136. Traditional Chinese Society

ANSC 137. Chinese Popular Religion

ANSC 142. Anthropology of Latin America

ANSC 143. Mental Health as Global Health Priority

ANSC 165. Contemporary South Asia

ANSC 187. The Anthropology of Mental health in Israel and the Diaspora

ANAR 113. “A Land Whose Stones Are Iron”: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives on Natural Resources in Israel

ANAR 114. Environmental Hazards in Israel

ANAR 115. Costal Geomorphology and Environmental Change—Perspectives from Israel and the South-Eastern Mediterranean

ANAR 116. Sea Level Change—The Israeli Example in World Perspective

ANAR 124. Archaeology of Asia

ANAR 138. Mesopotamia: The Emergence of Civilization

ANAR 141. Prehistory of the Holy Land

ANAR 142. The Rise and Fall of Ancient Israel

ANAR 143. Biblical Archaeology—Face or Fiction

ANAR 144. Pharaohs, Mummies, and Pyramids: Introduction to Egyptology

ANAR 145S. Study Abroad: Egypt of the Pharaohs

ANAR 153. The Mysterious Maya

ANAR 154. The Aztecs and Their Ancestors

ANAR 155S. Study Abroad: Ancient Mesoamerica

ANAR 156. The Archaeology of South America

ANAR 157. Early Empires of the Andes: The Middle Horizon

ANAR 157S. Early Empires of the Andes: The Middle Horizon

ANAR 158. The Inca: Empire of the Andes

ANAR 185. Middle East Desert Ecology

ANAR 190. Eastern Mediterranean Archaeological Field School

ANAR 194S. Summer Middle East Archaeological Field School

Communication

COMM 104D. Comparative Media Systems: Asia

COMM 104E. Comparative Media Systems: Europe

COMM 104F. Comparative Media Systems: Africa

COMM 104G. Comparative Media Systems: Latin America and the Caribbean

COMM 106G. Cultural Industries: Tourism: Global Industry and Cultural Form

COMM 112G. Interaction and Mediation: Language and Globalization

COMM 114J. CSI Food Justice

COMM 128. Education and Global Citizenship

COMM 135. Contemporary Minority Media Makers and the Festival Experience

COMM 138. Black Women, Feminism, and Media

COMM 140. Cinema in Latin America

COMM 155. Latino Space, Place, and Culture

COMM 158. Representations of the Israeli/Palestinian Conflict

COMM 168. Bilingual Communication

COMM 177. Culture, Domination, and Resistance

COMM 179. Global Nature/Global Culture

COMM 181. Neoliberal Cities

History

HIEA 115. Social and Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Japan

HIEA 117. Ghosts of Japan

HIEA 120. Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture

HIEA 121. Medieval Chinese Culture and Society

HIEA 122. Late Imperial Chinese Culture and Society

HIEA 125. Women and Gender in East Asia

HIEA 126. The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History

HIEA 128. History of Material Culture in China

HIEA 129. Faces of the Chinese Past

HIEA 133. Twentieth Century China: Cultural History

HIEA 134. History of Thought and Religion in China: Confucianism

HIEA 135. Thought and Religion in China: Buddhism

HIEA 136. History of Thought and Religion in China: Daoism

HIEA 137. Women and Family in Chinese History

HIEA 138. Women and the Chinese Revolution

HIEU 105. The Early Christian Church

HIEU 110. The Rise of Europe

HIEU 111. Europe in the Middle Ages

HIEU 115. The Pursuit of the Millennium

HIEU 118. Americanization of Europe

HIEU 120. The Renaissance in Italy

HIEU 125. Reformation Europe

HIEU 127. Sport in the Modern World

HIEU 129. Paris, Past and Present

HIEU 130. Europe in the Eighteenth Century

HIEU 136B. European Society and Social Thought, 1870–1989

HIEU 142. European Intellectual History, 1780–1870

HIEU 143. European Intellectual History, 1870–1945

HIEU 145. The Holocaust as Public History

HIEU 152. The Worst of Times: Everyday Life in Authoritarian and Dictatorial Societies

HILA 115. The Latin American City, a History

HILA 121A. History of Brazil

HILA 124A. History of Women and Gender in Latin America

HILA 126. From Columbus to Castro: Caribbean Culture and Society

HINE 102. The Jews in their Homeland in Antiquity

HINE 103. The Jewish Diaspora in Antiquity

HINE 108. The Middle East before Islam

HINE 113. Ancient Near East Mythology

HISC 102. Technology in World History

HISC 103. Gender and Science in Historical Perspective

HISC 104. History of Popular Science

HISC 105. History of Environmentalism

HISC 106. The Scientific Revolution

HISC 107. The Emergence of Modern Science

HISC 108. Life Sciences in the Twentieth Century

HISC 109. Invention of Tropical Disease

HISC 110. Historical Encounters of Science and Religion

HISC 111. The Atomic Bomb and the Atomic Age

HISC 114. The Darwinian Legacy

HISC 117. History of the Neurosciences

HISC 118. History of Sexology

HITO 104. The Jews and Judaism in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds

HITO 105. Jewish Modernity from 1648 to 1948

HITO 106. Love and Family in the Jewish Past

HITO 119/HMNR 100. Human Rights I: Introduction to Human Rights and Global Justice

HITO 126. A History of Childhood

Linguistics

LIGN 141. Language Structures

LIGN 142. Language Typology

LIGN 143. Structure of Spanish

LIGN 150. Historical Linguistics

LIGN 152. Indigenous Languages of the Americas

LIGN 155. Evolution of Language

LIGN 175. Sociolinguistics

LIGN 176. Language of Politics and Advertising

Literature

Literatures in English (LTEN):

LTEN 188. Contemporary Caribbean Literature

LTEN 189. Twentieth-Century Postcolonial Literatures

Literatures of the World (LTWL):

LTWL 140. Novel and History in the Third World

LTWL 143. Arab Literatures and Cultures

LTWL 144. Islam and Cinema

LTWL 150. Modernity and Literature

LTWL 157. Iranian Film

LTWL 168. Death and Desire in India

Literatures of the Americas (LTAM):

LTAM 110. Latin American Literature in Translation

LTAM 111. Comparative Caribbean Discourse

LTAM 130. Reading North by South

LTAM 132. The Dark Side of Enlightenment in Spain, the Americas, and the Philippines

Literature/Cultural Studies (LTCS):

LTCS 133. Globalization and Culture

LTCS 141. Special Topics in Race and Empire

And all courses listed under

African Literatures (LTAF)

Literatures in Chinese (LTCH)

East Asian Literatures (LTEA)

European and Eurasian Literature (LTEU)

Literatures in French (LTFR) with exception of LTFR 160

Literatures in German (LTGM)

Greek Literature (LTGK)

Literatures in Italian (LTIT) with exception of LTIT 161

Korean Literature (LTKO)

Latin Literature (LTLA)

Russian Literature (LTRU) with exception of LTRU 104A, B, C

Literatures in Spanish (LTSP) with exception of LTSP 151, 154, 160, 162, 166

With approval of the undergraduate adviser, students may take up to two theory or methods courses selected from Literature/Theory (LTTH) courses LTTH 110, LTTH 115, or LTTH 150, and from among the Literature/Cultural Studies (LTCS) courses LTCS 100, LTCS 102, or LTCS 120.

Philosophy

PHIL 139. Global Justice

PHIL 162. Contemporary Moral Issues

PHIL 165. Freedom, Justice, and the Law

PHIL 168. Philosophy of Law

Sociology

SOCI 106M. Holocaust Diaries

SOCI 121. Economy and Society

SOCI 123. Japanese Culture Inside/Out: A Transnational Perspective

SOCI 125. Sociology of Immigration

SOCI 133. Immigration in Contemporary Perspective

SOCI 134. The Making of Modern Medicine

SOCI 136E. Sociology of Mental Illness: A Historical Approach

SOCI 148. Political Sociology

SOCI 152. Social Inequality and Public Policy

SOCI 156. Sociology of Religion

SOCI 157. Religion in Contemporary Society

SOCI 158. Islam in the Modern World

SOCI 163. Migration and the Law

SOCI 169. Citizenship, Community, and Culture

SOCI 175. Nationality and Citizenship

SOCI 176. Transnational Japan Research

SOCI 177. International Terrorism

SOCI 178. The Holocaust

SOCI 179. Social Change

SOCI 180. Social Movements and Social Protests

SOCI 181. Modern Western Society

SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples of Latin America

SOCI 185. Globalization and Social Development

SOCI 187. African Societies Through Films

SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics

SOCI 188E. Community and Social Change in Africa

SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society

SOCI 188G. Chinese Society

SOCI 188I. The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

SOCI 188J. Change in Modern South Africa

SOCI 188M. Social Movements in Latin America

SOCI 188O. Settlements and Peacemaking in Israel

SOCI 189. Special Topics in Comparative-Historical Sociology


Note:
SOCI 189 must be preapproved by program adviser.