Linguistics

[ major | minor | graduate program | courses | faculty ]

3016 Applied Physics and Mathematics Building
Muir College
http://ling.ucsd.edu

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

In what ways do languages differ, and in what ways are all human languages alike? These are the basic questions that the science of linguistics seeks to answer.

In formulating hypotheses about language it has been found that languages have intricate structure at a number of different levels. Phonetics studies the sounds of speech and how they are produced and perceived. Phonology studies the principles by which the sounds of a language are organized into a system and combined into syllables and larger units. Morphology studies the principles by which smaller units of meaning are combined into words. Syntax is the study of the principles by which words are combined into larger units such as phrases and sentences. Semantics studies meaning—the meanings of words and the ways the meanings of words are related to the meanings of larger units such as the phrase, the sentence, and the discourse. Linguists attempt to discover to what extent the principles at each level vary across languages, and to what extent they are universal.

Because language provides a window into the human mind, linguistics plays a central role in the study of human cognition and figures prominently in the fields of cognitive science and psychology. We know, for example, that all normal children succeed in learning language relatively quickly at a time when their other cognitive abilities are still developing. The universal properties of human language that linguists discover can be used to provide models of this process, to explain why it occurs so rapidly, and to make specific predictions about the way it unfolds. The results of linguistic research can also be tested directly in experimental studies of how language is represented and processed in the mind (psycholinguistics) and brain (neurolinguistics). Language can also be studied in terms of its function as a cognitive system shared by an entire society (sociolinguistics); sociolinguists investigate the ways in which the language we use is affected by our social environment.

The Department of Linguistics offers a series of lower-division courses designed to introduce nonmajors to the scientific study of language in the broader perspective of a liberal arts education. These are LIGN 3 (Language as a Social and Cultural Phenomenon), LIGN 4 (Language as a Cognitive System), LIGN 7 (Sign Language and Its Culture), LIGN 8 (Languages and Cultures in America), and LIGN 17 (Making and Breaking Codes). These courses may be used to satisfy the Marshall College disciplinary breadth requirement. Lower-division linguistics courses may be used to satisfy the social sciences requirement at Muir College and Revelle College, and they partially fulfill the requirements for a program of concentration in Warren College. In addition, certain linguistics courses satisfy the American Cultures requirement in Revelle College and the cultural diversity requirement in Muir College and Warren College. LIGN 17 (Making and Breaking Codes) satisfies the Thurgood Marshall Computational Skills requirement in addition to the formal skills requirement in Warren College and in the Human Development Program. This course also satisfies the Structured Reasoning requirement in Sixth College. Students should consult their college advising offices to determine which linguistics courses satisfy these other requirements.

Linguistics courses are relevant to a wide range of fields of study at UC San Diego, including anthropology, cognitive science, communication, computer science, human development, law and society, psychology, and sociology, as well as areas such as African studies, Chinese studies, critical gender studies, ethnic studies, Judaic studies, Latin American studies, and others. In some cases certain linguistics courses count toward a major or minor in one of these departments or programs. Students should consult with a faculty adviser in linguistics and the other department or program when deciding on their course of study.

Students are able to participate in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) and UC San Diego’s Opportunities Abroad Program (OAP) while still making progress toward the major. Students considering this option should discuss their plans with the department undergraduate adviser before going abroad. Detailed information on EAP/OAP is found in this catalog under the heading “Education Abroad Program.”

The Department of Linguistics oversees the Linguistics Language Program, which offers basic language instruction in Arabic, ASL, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish. Courses from the Language Program satisfy general-education requirements, as well as the Department of Linguistics language requirement. Graduate students who require a reading knowledge of French or German may enroll in LIFR 11 or LIGM 11, respectively.

The department also offers language instruction for individuals who grew up in an English-speaking environment while speaking a different language at home (currently Arabic, Korean, Persian, Tagalog, and Vietnamese; other languages including Armenian, Cantonese, and Hindi may be added if student demand is sufficient). Instruction in these languages is designed to raise students’ linguistic and cultural competence to professional levels. Finally, directed self-instruction is available for a wide variety of languages through LIDS 19.

Note: Please check with the department’s student affairs officers for updates concerning programs and course offerings.

The Major Program

General Requirements

Every linguistics major (except the language studies major) must satisfy the undergraduate language requirement and must successfully complete a minimum of twelve upper-division courses. In addition to the general major, the department offers a set of enriched major programs in various specializations.

Except for LIGN 199, no course taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis may be counted toward a linguistics major. No more than one quarter of LIGN 199 may be counted toward a linguistics major. For the general linguistics, language and society, and cognition and language majors, at least six out of the twelve upper-division linguistics courses counted toward the major must be linguistics courses taken in residence at UC San Diego. For the language studies major, at least six out of the twelve upper division courses counted toward the major must be taken at UC San Diego, and at least four of these must be linguistics courses that satisfy Part A of the language studies course requirements. A letter grade of C– or better is required for every course counted toward a linguistics major, including courses taken to satisfy the department’s undergraduate language requirement.

Required Linguistics Courses

Linguistics 101 is required as an introduction to the field and serves as the prerequisite to certain other courses. Students who choose a linguistics major should enroll in it as early as possible.

Every major program in linguistics (except the language studies major) must include the following required courses covering basic areas of the field:

LIGN 101. Introduction to the Study of Language

LIGN 110. Phonetics

LIGN 111. Phonology I

LIGN 120. Morphology

LIGN 121. Syntax I

LIGN 130. Semantics

Students are advised to take these required courses as early as possible, since the background they provide may be needed for other upper-division linguistics courses. Check individual course listings for prerequisite information.

Linguistics Electives

LIGN 105. Law and Language

LIGN 108. Languages of Africa

LIGN 119. First and Second Language Learning: From Childhood Through Adolescence

LIGN 140. The Structure of American Sign Language

LIGN 141. Language Structures

LIGN 142. Language Typology

LIGN 143. The Structure of Spanish

LIGN 144. Discourse Analysis: American Sign Language and Performing Arts

LIGN 145. Pidgins and Creoles

LIGN 146. Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities

LIGN 150. Historical Linguistics

LIGN 155. Evolution of Language

LIGN 160. Pragmatics

LIGN 165. Computational Linguistics

LIGN 170. Psycholinguistics

LIGN 171. Child Language Acquisition

LIGN 173. Heritage Languages

LIGN 174. Gender and Language in Society

LIGN 175. Sociolinguistics

LIGN 176. Language of Politics and Advertising

LIGN 177. Multilingualism

LIGN 179. Second Language Acquisition Research

LIGN 180. Language Representation in the Brain

LIGN 181. Language Processing in the Brain

Restricted Courses

LIGN 87. Freshman Seminar (does not count as a linguistics elective)

LIGN 192. Senior Seminar in Linguistics (does not count as a linguistics elective)

LIGN 195. Apprentice Teaching (does not count as a linguistics elective)

LIGN 197. Linguistics Internship

LIGN 199. Independent Study in Linguistics

LIGN 199H. Honors Independent Study in Linguistics

Note to Revelle and Warren students:

Revelle: For Revelle College only, the classification of the linguistics major as humanities, natural science, or social science must be determined on the basis of each student’s specific program. The classification of the major program will in turn determine what areas will be acceptable for the noncontiguous minor.

Warren: For Warren College only, any courses taken in departments other than linguistics may not overlap with the student’s outside area(s) of concentration.

Undergraduate Language Requirement

Linguistics majors must demonstrate proficiency in one foreign language.

Proficiency in a foreign language may be demonstrated in three ways:

  1. By passing the reading proficiency examination and the oral interview administered by the Department of Linguistics in French, German, Italian, or Spanish; or
  2. By successfully completing a course given at UC San Diego representing the fourth quarter (or beyond) of instruction in any single foreign language with a grade of C– or better; or
  3. By scoring four or greater on the Advanced Placement (AP) exam.

Students are encouraged to satisfy this requirement as early as possible in order to be able to use the language for reference in linguistics courses. Students with native language competence in a language other than English may petition to have English count as satisfying the proficiency requirement.

General Major (12 courses)

The general major in linguistics requires satisfaction of the undergraduate language requirement and successful completion of twelve upper-division courses:

Six required linguistics courses

LIGN 101

LIGN 110

LIGN 111

LIGN 120

LIGN 121

LIGN 130

Five linguistics electives

One additional linguistics elective or upper-division course in another department pertaining to the study of language. Courses currently approved to satisfy this requirement include the electives for the cognition and language major (except PSYC 105) and the electives for the language and society major (Note: some of these courses may have prerequisites) or a Heritage Language course offered in the Linguistics Language Program (for example, LIHL 112/LIHL 112X).

Specialized Majors

Every student with a specialized major must consult the faculty adviser in the Department of Linguistics to have approved an individual curricular plan to satisfy the major requirements for the option chosen. Each specialized major requires satisfaction of the undergraduate language requirement and successful completion of upper-division requirements as specified below. The specialization will be reflected in the wording of a degree, e.g., “BA in Linguistics (with Specialization in Language and Society).”

Cognition and Language (12 courses)

Six required linguistics courses

LIGN 101

LIGN 110

LIGN 111

LIGN 120

LIGN 121

LIGN 130

Four linguistics electives chosen from

LIGN 155

LIGN 165

LIGN 170

LIGN 171

LIGN 176

LIGN 179

LIGN 180

LIGN 181

Two additional courses from linguistics or other departments subject to adviser approval.

Courses currently approved to satisfy this requirement include the following. Note: some of these courses may have prerequisites.

Linguistics

Any upper-division courses (except those used to fulfill requirements A and B).

Anthropology

ANBI 140. The Evolution of the Human Brain

ANBI 159. Biological and Cultural Perspectives on Intelligence

ANBI 173. Cognition in Animals and Humans

Cognitive Science

COGS 101C. Language

COGS 102A. Distributed Cognition

COGS 102B. Cognitive Ethnography

COGS 107C. Cognitive Neuroscience

COGS 108D. Programming Methods for Cognitive Science

COGS 108E. Neural Network Models of Cognition I

COGS 108F. Advanced Programming Methods for Cognitive Science

COGS 151. Analogy and Conceptual Systems

COGS 154. Communication Disorders in Children and Adults

COGS 156. Language Development

COGS 170. Natural and Artificial Symbolic Representational Systems

COGS 184. Modeling the Evolution of Cognition

COGS 191. Laboratory Research

Computer Science and Engineering

CSE 133. Information Retrieval

Philosophy

PHIL 120. Symbolic Logic I

PHIL 134. Philosophy of Language

PHIL 136. Philosophy of Mind

PHIL 150. Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences

Psychology

PSYC 105. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology

PSYC 118A. Real-Time Examination of Language Processing

PSYC 118B. Real-Time Examination of Language Processing

PSYC 119. Psycholinguistics/Cognition Laboratory

PSYC 145. Psychology of Language

Language and Society (12 courses)

Six required linguistics courses

Two appropriate upper-division courses in other departments (especially the Departments of Anthropology, Communication, Cognitive Science, or Sociology), selected in consultation with the faculty adviser for language and society. Courses currently approved to satisfy this requirement include the following. Note: some of these courses may have prerequisites.

ANSC 162. Language, Identity, and Community [formerly known as ANGN 112]

ANSC 122. Language in Society [formerly known as ANGN 149]

COMM 100B. Interpretive Strategies

COMM 168. Bilingual Communication

COMM 110T. Language, Literacy, and Communication: Language, Thought, and Media

COMM 169. Deaf Culture in the U.S.

COMM 110P. Language, Literacy, and Communication: Language and Human Communication

COMM 112G. Interaction and Mediation: Language and Globalization

ETHN 140. Language and American Ethnicity

ETHN 141. Language, Culture, and Inequality

ETHN 144. Bilingual Communities in the USA

SOCI 117/EDS 117. Language, Culture, and Education

SOCI 118E. Sociology of Language

SOCI 120T. Special Topics in Culture, Language, and Social Interaction

EDS 125. History, Politics, and Theory of Bilingual Education

One course in sociolinguistics (by approval of the faculty adviser, may be taken in another department). Courses currently approved to satisfy this requirement include the following. Note: some of these courses may have prerequisites:

LIGN 174. Gender and Language in Society

LIGN 175. Sociolinguistics

LIGN 177. Multilingualism

Three linguistics electives. Courses particularly relevant to this specialization are

LIGN 105. Law and Language

LIGN 174. Gender and Language in Society

LIGN 175. Sociolinguistics

LIGN 176. Language of Politics and Advertising

LIGN 177. Multilingualism

Language Studies Major

Students majoring in language studies must consult with the language studies faculty adviser to approve an individual curricular plan.

The language studies major is designed for students who wish to pursue the study of a particular language from a variety of perspectives. To this end, students will take courses in linguistics and literature, as well as electives in linguistics, literature, culture, and area studies. This major provides preparation for a variety of careers that make use of second language skills. Depending on the elective emphasis, these include international business/law, teaching, translation, interpreting, linguistics, and foreign service. Each language studies major will specialize in one language of concentration. In principle, this could be any language other than English. However, some languages may require that some course work be completed outside UC San Diego. Hence, it is recommended that language studies majors consider a year abroad. Students whose language of concentration is American Sign Language will need to consult the faculty adviser for individualized requirements; these students may also consider an exchange year at Gallaudet University.

Requirements

Lower-division preparation:

Upper-division requirements:

Note: at least two of the upper-division courses must be conducted in the language of concentration. Students are encouraged to increase their academic exposure to their language of concentration by taking one-unit seminars in the language and by participating in the EAP program.

  1. Six upper-division linguistics courses, as follows:

    LIGN 101. Introduction to Linguistics

    Three courses chosen from
    LIGN 110. Phonetics
    LIGN 111. Phonology I
    LIGN 120. Morphology
    LIGN 121. Syntax I
    LIGN 130. Semantics
    LIGN 145. Pidgins and Creoles
    LIGN 150. Historical Linguistics

    “Structure of” language of concentration course (e.g., LIGN 143, Structure of Spanish). If no such course is available, the student must consult with the undergraduate adviser regarding a possible substitution.

    One additional upper-division LIGN course.
  2. Two upper-division courses in the literature of the language of concentration
  3. Four additional upper-division courses that deal with general linguistics, the language of concentration (e.g., literature), or the corresponding culture/area studies (e.g., anthropology, economics, history, political science, sociology), subject to approval of the faculty adviser.

    Approved courses for this requirement include the following. Note: some of these courses may have prerequisites.

Linguistics: Any upper-division courses (except those used to fulfill requirement A).

Literature: Any upper-division courses related to the language of concentration (except those used to fulfill requirement B).

Area Studies: Approved courses are listed by language of concentration; other languages of concentration are possible in principle, but probably require course work outside of UC San Diego.

Arabic

ANSC 133. Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

ECON 165. Middle East Economics

HINE 114. History of the Islamic Middle East

HINE 115. Islamic Civilization

HINE 118. The Middle East in the Twentieth Century

HINE 119. Contemporary Middle East Conflicts

HINE 122. Politicization of Religion in the Middle East

POLI 121B. Politics in Israel

RELI 112. Texts and Contexts: The Holy Book in Islam

ASL

COMM 169. Deaf Culture in the U.S.

Chinese

ANRG 170/ANSC 136. Traditional Chinese Society

ANRG 173/ANSC 137. Chinese Popular Religion

ANSC 136. Traditional Chinese Society

ANSC 137. Chinese Popular Religion

HIEA 120. Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture

HIEA 121. Medieval Chinese Culture and Society

HIEA 122. Late Imperial Chinese Culture and Society

HIEA 119/SOCB 162R. Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia

HIEA 125. Women and Gender in East Asia

HIEA 126. The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History

HIEA 128. History of Material Culture in China

HIEA 129. Faces of the Chinese Past

HIEA 130. End of the Chinese Empire, 1800–1911

HIEA 131. History of the Modern Chinese Revolution: 1911–1949

HIEA 132. History of the People’s Republic of China

HIEA 133. Twentieth-Century China: Cultural History

HIEA 134. History of Thought and Religion in China: Confucianism

HIEA 135. History of Thought and Religion in China: Buddhism

HIEA 136. History of Thought and Religion in China: Daoism

HIEA 137. Women and Family in Chinese History

HIEA 138. Women and the Chinese Revolution

HIEA 162/262. History of Women in China

HIEA 163/263. Cinema and Society in Twentieth-Century China

HIEA 164/264. Seminar in Late Imperial Chinese History

HIEA 165/265. Topics in Medieval Chinese History

HIEA 166/266. Creating Ming Histories

HIEA 167. Special Topics in Modern Chinese History

HIEA 168/268. Topics in Classical and Medieval Chinese History

HIEA 171/271. Society and Culture in Premodern China

POLI 113A. East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective

POLI 113B. Chinese and Japanese Political Thought I

POLI 130B. Politics in the People’s Republic of China

POLI 131C. The Chinese Revolution

POLI 132B. Politics and Revolution in China and Japan

POLI 132C. Political Development and Modern China

POLI 133D. Political Institutions of East Asian Countries

SOCI 188G. Chinese Society

SOCI 162R/HIEA 119. Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia

VIS 127B. Arts of China

VIS 127C. Arts of Modern China

VIS 127D. Early Chinese Painting

VIS 127E. Later Chinese Painting

VIS 127G. Twentieth-Century Chinese Art

VIS 127N. Twentieth-Century Art in China and Japan

French

HIEU 129. Paris, Past and Present

HIEU 130. Europe in the Eighteenth Century

HIEU 131. The French Revolution: 1789–1814

HIEU 142. European Intellectual History, 1780–1870

POLI 120C. Politics in France

TDHT 105. French Comedy

German

HIEU 130. Europe in the Eighteenth Century

HIEU 132. German Politics and Culture: 1648–1848

HIEU 142. European Intellectual History, 1780–1870

HIEU 143. European Intellectual History, 1870–1945

HIEU 145. The Holocaust as Public History

HIEU 154. Modern German History

HIEU 155. Modern Austria

HIEU 158. Why Hitler? How Auschwitz?

HIEU 172/272. Comparative European Fascism

HIEU 174/274. The Holocaust: A Psychological Approach

HIEU 177. Special Topics in Modern German Thought

PHIL 106. Kent

PHIL 107. Hegel

POLI 120B. The German Political System

POLI 120D. Germany: Before, During, and After Division

SOCI 178. The Holocaust

TDHT 106. Brecht and Beyond

Hebrew

ANRG 150/ANAR 142. The Rise and Fall of Ancient Israel

HIEU 159. Three Centuries of Zionism, 1648–1948

HIEU 176/276. Politics in the Jewish Past

HINE 102. The Jews in Their Homeland in Antiquity

HINE 103. The Jewish Diaspora in Antiquity

HINE 111. Anthropology and the Hebrew Bible

HINE 112A. Great Stories from the Hebrew Bible

HINE 112B. Great Poems from the Hebrew Bible

HINE 161/HINE 261. Seminar in the Hebrew Bible

HINE 162/262. Anthropology and the Hebrew Bible           

HINE 170. Special Topics in Jewish History

HINE 181/281. Problems in the Study of Hebrew Manuscripts

HINE 186. Special Topics in Middle Eastern History

POLI 121. Government and Politics of the Middle East

POLI 121B. Politics in Israel

RELI 111. Texts and Contexts: The Holy Book in Christianity and Judaism

SOCI 188F. Modern Jewish Societies and Israeli Society

Italian

HIEU 119. Modern Italy: From Unification to the Present

HIEU 120. The Renaissance in Italy

HIEU 121. Early Modern Italy

HIEU 122. Politics Italian Renaissance Style

HIEU 172/272. Comparative European Fascism

POLI 120I. Politics in Italy

TDHT 104. Italian Comedy

VIS 122AN. Renaissance Art

VIS 122CN. Defining High Renaissance Art

VIS 122D. Michelangelo

VIS 122F. Leonardo’s La Gioconda

Japanese

ECON 163. Japanese Economy

HIEA 110. Japan Through the Twelfth Century

HIEA 111. Japan: Twelfth to Mid-Nineteenth Centuries

HIEA 112. Japan: From the Mid-Nineteenth Century through the US Occupation

HIEA 113. The Fifteen-Year War in Asia and the Pacific

HIEA 114. Postwar Japan

HIEA 115. Social and Cultural History of Twentieth-Century Japan

HIEA 116. Japan-U.S. Relations

HEA 117. Ghosts in Japan

HIEA 125. Women and Gender in East Asia

HIEA 126. The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History

HIEA 160. Colloquium on Modern Japanese History

POLI 113A. East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective

POLI 113B. Chinese and Japanese Political Thought I

POLI 132B. Politics and Revolution in China and Japan

POLI 133A. Japanese Politics: A Developmental Perspective

POLI 133D. Political Institutions of East Asian Countries

POLI 133E. Public Policy in Japan

VIS 127F. Japanese Buddhist Art

VIS 127N. Twentieth-Century Art in China and Japan

VIS 127P. Arts of Japan

VIS 127Q. Japanese Painting and Prints

Russian

HIEU 134. The Formation of the Russian Empire, 800–1855

HIEU 156. History of the Soviet Union, 1905–1991

HIEU 178. Soviet History

POLI 126AB. Politics and Economics in Eastern Europe

POLI 130AA. The Soviet Successor States

POLI 130AC. Seminar: Post-Soviet Politics

POLI 130AD. The Politics of the Russian Revolution

Spanish

ANAR 156. The Archaeology of South America

ANSC 131. Urban Cultures in Latin America

ANSC 142. Anthropology of Latin America

COMM 142. Cuban Cinema

COMM 155. Latino Space, Place, and Culture

COMM 104G. Comparative Media Systems: Latin America and the Caribbean

COMM 140. Cinema in Latin America

ECON 161. Global Integration of Latin America

ECON 162. Economics of Mexico

ETHN 116. The United States–Mexico Border in Comparative Perspective

ETHN 129/USP 135. Asian and Latina Immigrant Workers in the Global Economy

ETHN 132. Chicano Dramatic Literature

ETHN 133. Hispanic American Dramatic Literature

ETHN 135A. Early Latino/a-Chicano/a Cultural Production: 1848–1960

ETHN 135B. Contemporary Latino/a- Chicano/a Cultural Production: 1960 to Present

ETHN 136. Topics in Chicano/a-Latino/a Cultures

ETHN 138. Chicano/a and Latino/a Poetry

ETHN 145. Spanish Language in the United States

ETHN 148. Latino/a and Chicano/a Literature

ETHN 180. Topics in Mexican American History

HIEU 138. Imperial Spain, 1476–1808

HIEU 151. Spain since 1808

HILA 100. Latin America-Colonial Transformations

HILA 101. Latin America: The Construction of Independence 1810–1898

HILA 102. Latin America in the Twentieth Century

HILA 103. Revolution in Modern Latin America

HILA 104. Modern U.S.–Latin American Relations

HILA 108. Economic History: Continuity and Change in Latin America

HILA 112. Economic and Social History of the Andean Region

HILA 113. Lord and Peasant in Latin America

HILA 114. Dictatorship in Latin America

HILA 115. The Latin American City, A History

HILA 116. El Salvador and the United States: Human Rights and Revolution

HILA 120. History of Argentina

HILA 121. History of Brazil

HLA 122. Cuba: From Colony to Socialist Republic

HILA 124A. History of Women and Gender in Latin America

HILA 126. From Columbus to Castro: Caribbean Culture and Society

HILA 127. History, Culture, and Power

HILA 131. A History of Mexico

HILA 132. A History of Contemporary Mexico

HILA 161. History of Women in Latin America

HILA 162. Special Topics in Latin American History

HILA 163/263. The History of Chile, 1880–Present

HILA 164/264. Women’s Work and Family Life in Latin America

HILA 167/267. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Colonial Period

HILA 168/268. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Nineteenth Century

HILA 169/269. Scholarship on Latin American History in the Twentieth Century

LATI 120. Special Topics in Latin American Studies

THHS 109. African Heritage in Contemporary Drama: African, Caribbean, and African American

TDHT 110. Chicano Dramatic Literature

TDHT 111. Hispanic American Dramatic Literature

POLI 134AA. Comparative Politics of Latin America

POLI 134B. Politics in Mexico

POLI 134D. Selected Topics in Latin American Politics

POLI 134I. Politics in the Southern Cone of Latin America

POLI 134N. Politics in Central America

POLI 146A. The U.S. and Latin America: Political and Economic Relations

SOCI 151M. Chicanos in American Society

SOCI 182. Ethnicity and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America

SOCI 188D. Latin America: Society and Politics

VIS 125F. Latin American Film

VIS 126P. Latin American Art: Modern to Postmodern, 1890–1950

VIS 126Q. Latin American Art: Modern to Postmodern, 1950–Present

VIS 126R. Latin American Photography

Honors Program

The department offers an honors program for outstanding students. Those students who have a 3.75 GPA in linguistics (3.25 overall) at the end of their junior year are eligible to participate. Students interested in participating in the honors program should consult with their department adviser: admission to the program requires nomination by the adviser and approval of the department faculty.

The honors program requires that two graduate linguistics courses be taken as part of the twelve required courses for the major, and further requires one quarter of LIGN 199H. During one of the two graduate courses, the student, in consultation with the instructor and a proposed faculty adviser (if different from the instructor), will begin a substantial research project which will be continued during the quarter of 199H and will culminate in an honors paper. Responsibility for proposing possible projects and completing necessary paperwork rests with the student. Upon successful completion of the requirements the designation “with distinction,” “with high distinction,” or “with highest distinction” will appear on the student’s diploma.

Students interested in participating in the honors program should approach and consult with a departmental faculty member who would serve as their adviser; admission to the program requires nomination by the adviser and approval of the department faculty.

Independent Study and Directed Group Study in Linguistics for Majors

Upon presentation of a written study proposal or project, and with the consent of a faculty member who would serve as the adviser for the project, linguistics majors with at least a 3.5 GPA in the major courses may request permission to undertake independent study in linguistics (LIGN 199). No more than one such course (to be taken Pass/Not Pass) may count toward the major.

The Minor Program

The Linguistics minor consists of LIGN 101, plus six additional courses in linguistics, at least four of which must be upper division.

For all courses counted toward the linguistics minor, the student must receive letter grades of C– or better. Courses counted toward the minor may not be taken on a Pass/Not Pass basis, except LIGN 199. Only one quarter of LIGN 199 may be counted toward the minor.

The Language Studies minor consists of seven courses, at least five of which must be upper division:

Literature: One upper-division literature course is required in the language of concentration. This will require proficiency as well as lower-division prerequisites. Therefore, the lower-division courses of the minor may consist of prerequisites for the upper-division literature requirement. American Sign Language students may substitute a nonliterature upper-division elective with approval of the faculty adviser.

Linguistics: LIGN 101 is required. In addition students must take a “Structure of” language of concentration course (e.g., LIGN 143 Structure of Spanish). If no such course is available, the student must consult with the undergraduate adviser regarding a possible substitution.

Other: Two additional courses that deal with general linguistics, the language of concentration (e.g., literature), or the corresponding culture, subject to approval of the faculty adviser are required.