Visual Arts

[ graduate program | courses | faculty ]

216 Mandeville Center for the Arts
http://visarts.ucsd.edu

All courses, faculty listings, and curricular and degree requirements described herein are subject to change or deletion without notice. Updates may be found on the Academic Senate website: http://senate.ucsd.edu/catalog-copy/approved-updates/.

The Department of Visual Arts offers courses in painting, drawing, sculpture, performance, computing in the arts, film, video, photography, and art history/criticism (including that of film and video). A bachelor’s degree from this department provides students with a solid liberal arts background and is preparatory training for careers as artists, art historians, filmmakers, video artists, photographers, digital media artists, and art critics. It also provides students the initial skills required for teaching and work in museums, television, and the commercial film, photography, and Internet industries.

By its composition, the Department of Visual Arts is biased in the direction of actively producing artists and critics whose presence at the center of the contemporary art world necessitates reconsideration and reevaluation of artistic productions, their information structure, and significance. Consequently, a flexible introductory program of historically based courses has been devised mainly to provide the student an opportunity to concentrate on areas involving significantly different aesthetic and communication structures. A series of studio courses, in which painting and sculpture are included, is presented to bring the student into direct contact with the real contingencies compelling redistribution of aesthetic attitudes and reinterpretation of genres. Because of the exploratory nature of our program, the department is prepared to emphasize new media that would traditionally be considered to have scant relation to the visual arts. Thus, courses in theatrical events, linguistic structures, etc., are provided. In this context, theoretical courses with a media orientation, as in film, video, photography, or computing, are also offered.

The Department of Visual Arts is located in the Mandeville Center for the Arts. In addition, the master of fine arts program office, as well as faculty and graduate students’ studios/research spaces are located in the Visual Arts Facility sited in Sixth College. Facilities and equipment are available to undergraduates in both the Mandeville Center and at the campuswide Media Center, providing the opportunity to study painting, drawing, photography, computing in the arts, 16mm film, performance, sculpture, and video. Facilities at the Media Center include portable video recording equipment, video and audio editing suites, nonlinear editing, and production studios. Additional film equipment available includes an animation stand, optical printer, two sound-mixing studios, and numerous film editing suites. Courses in computing in the arts take place in labs located at the Visual Arts Facility and the Mandeville Center.

The University Art Gallery displays a continually changing series of exhibitions, and the Mandeville Annex Gallery, located on the lower level, is directed by visual arts undergraduate students. A gallery and performance space, located in the Visual Arts Facility, are directed by graduate students.

The Undergraduate Program

College Requirements

The Department of Visual Arts teaches courses applicable toward the Muir, Sixth, and Warren general-education requirements, the Marshall humanities requirement, the Eleanor Roosevelt and Revelle fine arts requirements. Optional minors may be taken within any college.

Minor in Visual Arts

The Department of Visual Arts offers minors in seven areas of study: studio painting/drawing/ sculpture, photography, computing, art history, history and criticism of film and video, digital video and film production, and ICAM. A minor consists of seven specific courses, of which at least five must be upper division. No more than two upper-division courses may be taken outside of UC San Diego. Because the requirements differ for each minor, prospective visual arts minors should consult with the departmental adviser for a complete list of appropriate classes acceptable for the minor.

Students are advised to begin their program in the second year; otherwise, they cannot be guaranteed enough time to complete the classes required for a minor.

Art History (VA26)

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/art-history-minor

Required Courses

20. Introduction to Art History

Choose one from

21A. Introduction to Art of the Americans or Africa and Oceania

21B. Introduction to Asian Art

Choose one course from three of the five Distribution areas A–E.

Please refer to the art history major (http://visarts.ucsd.edu/sites/default/files/ArtHistoryguide092011-2.pdf) for the course options in each area:

Choose two additional art history courses from any area A–E.

Studio Minor (VA28)

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/studio-minor

Lower Division

Required:                                                                                        

VIS 22. Formations of Modern Art                                          

VIS 80. Introduction to the Studio Major                             

Upper Division

Required:

VIS 111. Structure of Art

Choose four upper-division studio courses: 105A–107CN.

ICAM: Interdisciplinary Computing and the Arts (VA29)

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/icam-interdisciplinary-computing-and-arts-minor

Seven Courses Required:
Lower Division

Required:

VIS 41. Design Communication

Choose one from:

VIS 1. Introduction to Art Making

MUS 4. Introduction to Western Music

Upper Division

Required:

ICAM 110. Computer Arts: Current Practice

VIS 159. History of Art and Technology

Choose one from:

VIS 142. Practices in Computing Arts

VIS 145A. Digital Media I: Time, Movement, and Sound

MUS 171. Computer Music I

Choose two from:

ICAM 120. Virtual Environments

VIS 149. Seminar in Contemporary Computer Topics

MUS 170. Musical Acoustics

MUS 172. Computer Music II

MUS 176. Music Technology Seminar

VIS 132. Installation Production and Studio

VIS 141A. Computer Programming for the Arts I

VIS 141B. Computer Programming for the Arts II

VIS 145B. Digital Media II

VIS 147A. Electronic Technologies for Art I

VIS 147B. Electronic Technologies for Art II

Speculative Design (VA30)

Required Courses

30. Introduction to Speculative Design

41. Design Communication

Choose one from:

1. Introduction to Art Making: Two-Dimensional Practices

2. Introduction to Art Making: Motion and Time-Based Art

3. Introduction to Art Making: Three-Dimensional Practices

Choose two from:

100. Introduction to Public Culture

142. Practices in Computing Arts

159. History of Art and Technology

Choose two from:

100A. Design of Public Culture

101. Introduction to Urban Ecologies

101A. Design of Urban Ecologies

VIS 102. Cross-Border Urbanizations

VIS 109*. Advanced Projects in Media

VIS 130. Special Projects in Visual Arts       

VIS 141A*. Introduction to Computer Programming in the Arts

VIS 141B*. Advanced Computer Programming in the Arts

VIS 145A*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media I

VIS 145B*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media II

VIS 147A. Electronic Technologies for Art I

VIS 147B. Electronic Technologies for Art II

VIS 149. Contemporary Computing Topics

VIS 161. Systems and Networks at Scale

VIS 162. Speculative Science and Design Invention

VIS 163. Systems and Synthesis: Topics in Design Research and Criticism

VIS 174*. Media Sketchbook                      

TDGE 126. Storytelling and Design in Animation

TDDE 141. Theater Process (Sound Design)

TDDE 142. Advanced Sound Design

Photography (MO54)

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/photography-minor

Required courses

22. Formations of Modern Art

60. Introduction to Digital Photography

111. Structure of Art

158. Histories of Photography

159. History of Art and Technology

164. Photographic Strategies

165. Camera Techniques

Digital Video and Film Production (MO71)

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/digital-video-and-film-production-minor

Seven courses required:
Lower Division

Required:

VIS 70N. Introduction to Media

VIS 84. History of Film

Upper Division

Required:

VIS 111. Structure of Art

VIS 174. Media Sketchbook

Choose one upper-division course in digital video and film production listed below:

VIS 171. Digital Cinema: Theory and Production

VIS 175. Editing: Theory and Production

VIS 176. 16 mm Filmmaking

VIS 177. Scripting Strategies

VIS 178. Sound: Theory and Production

Choose two upper-division courses in the history and/or criticism of film and video: VIS 151, 152, 152D, 153, 154, 155, 156, 194S.

*Five unique upper-division courses in media are required if any of these courses overlap with your major or minor.

Students may not major in visual arts media (VA27) and minor in digital video and film production.

History and Criticism of Film and Video (MO72)

http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/history-and-criticism-film-and-video-minor

Required courses

70N. Introduction to Media

84. History of Film

111.* Structure of Art

Choose four upper-division courses in the history and/or criticism of film and video: VIS 151, 152, 152D, 153, 154, 155, 156, 194S.

*Five unique upper-division courses in media history/criticism are required if you are also completing a visual arts major or minor.

Education Abroad Program

Students are often able to participate in the UC Education Abroad Program (EAP) and UC San Diego’s Opportunities Abroad Program (OAP) while still making progress toward completing their major. Financial aid is applicable to study abroad and special study abroad scholarships are readily available. Students considering this option should discuss their plans with an Education Abroad adviser before going abroad, and courses taken abroad must be approved upon return by the departmental faculty adviser. More information on EAP/OAP is detailed in the Education Abroad Program of the UC San Diego General Catalog or on their website http://programsabroad.ucsd.edu/pao/. Interested students should contact the Programs Abroad Office in the International Center.

Residency Requirements

A minimum of two-thirds of the course work completed for the major must be taken at UC San Diego. Students who transfer to UC San Diego in their second or third year may petition to substitute courses taken at other colleges and universities for major requirements.

Visual Arts 111, Structure of Art, must be taken at UC San Diego by all students, including transfer students, in the art history, media, and studio majors.

Honors Programs

The department offers honors programs in art history, in media, and in studio for outstanding students.

The art history honors program will provide outstanding students with preprofessional experience. It consists of an issue-oriented seminar followed by a directed group study and will result in an exhibition with catalogue, a scholarly conference with a mock publication and/or series of research papers. Students who meet the criteria may, with permission of the art history faculty adviser or the art history honors seminar instructor, enroll in the art history honors program during the last quarter of their junior year or as a senior. This program is open to juniors and seniors who meet eligibility requirements: minimum major GPA of 3.5 (3.3 overall), completion of all lower-division art history requirements, completion of all upper-division art history distribution requirements, and completion of Art Historical Methods (VIS 112) and at least one additional art history seminar. The level of distinction will be determined by the faculty committee on the basis of work in the honors seminar and on the research project.

The media honors program will help students develop high-quality professional portfolios. The honors thesis project is a sequence of individual studies that runs the length of an academic year to provide sufficient time for ideas to develop and critically aware work to be produced. Students may arrange to work with different faculty advisers each term or may engage a single adviser for the year. To be eligible for the honors thesis sequence, students must have at least a 3.5 GPA in the major and have approval of all the advisers with whom they will work. Qualified students may begin their sequence the last quarter of their junior year or during their senior year. At the end of the third quarter, all involved media faculty will meet to critique the overall quality of the final thesis work to determine level of distinction.

Through exhibition, verbal and written presentations and course work, the studio honors program is intended to give the student as strong a technical, critical, and theoretical base as possible. The program is open to juniors and seniors with a minimum 3.5 GPA in the major (3.0 overall), who have completed all lower-division studio requirements and all upper-division groups I, II, III, and IV (subgroup A) requirements.

Students interested in participating in an honors program should consult with the departmental adviser.

Double Major within the Department

There are three double majors within the Department of Visual Arts: art history/theory/criticism paired with either studio, media, or ICAM. Students interested in a double major within the department must have at least ten upper-division courses that are unique to each departmental major and the remaining courses may overlap with other major requirements. Students should consult with the departmental adviser for additional information.

Major Requirements

Twenty courses are required in studio, media, and ICAM and eighteen courses in art history for the attainment of the bachelor of arts. A minimum of twelve of these courses must be upper-division, however, some majors may require more upper-division courses.

All courses taken to satisfy major requirements must be taken for a letter grade, and only grades of C– or better will be accepted in the visual arts major.

Studio Major

The studio major is aimed at producing a theoretically based, highly productive group of artists. Lower-division courses are structured to expose students to a variety of ideas in and about the visual arts. Introductory skills are taught, but their development will occur at the upper-division level in conjunction with the student’s increasing awareness of the range of theoretical possibilities in the field. The curriculum includes courses in drawing, painting, sculpture, performance, photography, digital imaging and electronics, and many offerings in art history/criticism.

Lower Division

Foundation Level

Five courses required.

VIS 80. Introduction to the Studio Major

VIS 22. Formations of Modern Art

Choose two art making courses:

VIS 1. Introduction to Art Making: Two-Dimensional Practices

VIS 2. Introduction to Art Making: Motion and Time-Based Art

VIS 3. Introduction to Art Making: Three-Dimensional Practices

VIS 41. Design Communication

VIS 60. Introduction to Digital Photography

VIS 70N. Introduction to Media

Choose one history course:

VIS 20. Introduction to Art History

VIS 21A. Introduction to the Art of the Americas

VIS 21B. Introduction to Asian Art

VIS 84. History of Film

Upper Division

Intermediate Level

Seven courses required.

VIS 111. Structure of Art

Choose three Group A courses:

VIS 105A. Drawing: Representing the Subject

VIS 105D. Aesthetics of Chinese Calligraphy

VIS 106A. Painting: Image Making

VIS 107A. Sculpture: Making the Object

Choose two Group B courses:

VIS 105B. Drawing: Practices and Genre

VIS 106B. Painting: Practices and Genre

VIS 107B. Sculpture: Practices and Genre

Choose one interdisciplinary course:

VIS 100. Introduction to Public Culture

VIS 102. Cross-Border Urbanization

VIS 142. Practices in Computing Arts

VIS 145A. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media

VIS 147A. Electronic Technologies for Art I

VIS 164. Photographic Strategies

VIS 165. Camera Techniques: Analog Futures

ICAM 120. Virtual Environments

History and Theory

Three courses required.

Choose three from:

Any upper-division art history course: VIS 120-129

Any upper-division media history course: VIS 151-159, 194S

Advanced Level

Five courses required.

Choose two art making courses:

VIS 105C. Drawing: Portfolio Projects

VIS 105E. Chinese Calligraphy as Installation

VIS 106C. Painting: Portfolio Projects

VIS 107C. Sculpture: Portfolio Projects

Choose three interdisciplinary courses:

VIS 108. Advanced Projects in Art

VIS 109. Advanced Projects in Media

VIS 110 A-J. Advanced: Various Topics

VIS 110M-N. Studio Honors

VIS 130. Special Projects in Visual Arts

VIS 131. Special Projects in Media

VIS 132. Installation Production and Studio

VIS 145B. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media

VIS 147B. Electronic Technologies for Art II

VIS 148. Visualizing Art Practice

VIS 149. Seminar in Contemporary Computer Topics

VIS 167. Social Engagement and Photography

VIS 168. Pictorialism and Constructed Reality

VIS 185. Senior Media Projects

VIS 198. Directed Group Study

VIS 199. Special Studies in Visual Arts

ICAM 110. Computing in the Arts: Current Practice

Note: The studio honors sequence, VIS 110M-N, counts as one course towards the fulfillment of an advanced level requirement.

Art History/Theory/Criticism Major

The major in art history, theory, and criticism is designed both for students who desire a broadly based education in the humanities and for those who plan to pursue a career in an art-related profession. In both cases, the foundation for study is proficiency in the languages of artistic expression. Through the study of art history, students learn to treat works of art as manifestations of human belief, thought, and experience in Western and non-Western societies from prehistory to the present day. Courses in criticism review the theoretical approaches that are used to understand artistic achievement. By combining art historical and critical study, the program promotes in the student an awareness of the cultural traditions that have shaped his or her intellectual outlook and provides a framework for informed judgment on the crucial issues of meaning and expression in contemporary society.

Majors are encouraged to take relevant courses in allied disciplines such as history, communication, anthropology, and literature, and in such area programs as classics and Italian studies. In addition, students who plan to apply to graduate schools are strongly advised to develop proficiency in one or more foreign languages, as is dictated by their area of specialization.

Lower Division

Foundation Level

Five courses required.

VIS 22. Formations of Modern Art

VIS 23*. Information Technologies in Art History

Choose two history courses:

VIS 20. Introduction to Art History

VIS 21A. Introduction to the Art of the Americas of Africa and Oceania

VIS 21B. Introduction to Asian Art

VIS 84. History of Film

Choose one art making course:

VIS 1. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 2. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 3. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 41. Design Communication

VIS 60. Introduction to Digital Photography

VIS 70N. Introduction to Media

VIS 80. Introduction to the Studio Major

Upper Division
Intermediate Level

Eight courses required.

VIS 111. Structure of Art

VIS 112*. Art Historical Methods

Choose six courses, at least one from each area, A-E:

A. European Pre-Modern: Ancient and Medieval
B. European Early Modern: Renaissance and Baroque
C. Modern and Contemporary
D. Arts of the Americas
E. Arts of Asia

You may fulfill the sixth course requirement with one additional course from above (A-E) or with one from the following:

VIS 100. Introduction to Public Culture

VIS 102. Cross-Border Urbanization

VIS 105A. Drawing: Representing the Subject

VIS 105D. The Aesthetics of Chinese Calligraphy

VIS 106A. Painting: Image Making

VIS 107A. Sculpture: Making the Object

VIS 142. Practices in Computing Arts

VIS 145A. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media I

VIS 147A. Electronic Technologies for Art I

VIS 164. Photographic Strategies

VIS 165. Camera Techniques: Analog Futures

ICAM 110. Computing in the Arts: Current Practice

ICAM 120. Virtual Environments

Advanced Level

Five courses required.

Choose one theory course:

VIS 113AN*. History of Criticism I

VIS 113BN*. History of Criticism II

VIS 113CN*. History of Criticism III

VIS 114A*. Landscape and Memory

VIS 114B*. The Fragment: Uses and Theories

VIS 117E*. Problems in Ethnoaesthetics

VIS 117F*. Theorizing the Americas

VIS 117G*. Visual Theory and Practice since 1980

VIS 117I*. Western and Non-Western Rituals and Ceremonies

VIS 129F*. Seminar in Art Theory and Criticism

Choose three seminar courses:

VIS 122F*. Leonardo’s La Gioconda

VIS 1125DN*. Marcel Duchamp

VIS 126C*. Problems in Mesoamerican Art History

VIS 126D*. Problems in Ancient Maya Iconography

VIS 127D*. Early Chinese Painting

VIS 127E*. Later Chinese Painting

VIS 127F*. Japanese Buddhist Art

VIS 127G*. Twentieth-Century Chinese Art

VIS 127Q*. Japanese Painting and Prints

VIS 129A*. Seminar in Pre-Modern Art History

VIS 129B*. Seminar in Early Modern Art History

VIS 129C*. Seminar in Modern Art History

VIS 129D*. Seminar in Art History of the Americas

VIS 129E*. Seminar in Art History of Asia

Note: Students may also select any course from the theory course list to count towards the seminar requirement. Course will count as ONE theory or seminar course, but not both.

Choose one elective course:

The completion of both VIS 129G and 129H count as one course towards fulfillment of the advanced level elective.

*seminar

Students must take at least three upper-division seminars in addition to VIS 112. These three additional seminars may come from any area and be taken in fulfillment of the distribution requirements or as open electives.

In accordance with standard university policy, the department requires that students take two-thirds of the upper-division courses in their major at UC San Diego. The distribution requirement must be fulfilled with courses taken at UC San Diego. Courses taken abroad or at other US institutions do not count toward, and will not be substituted for, the six-course distribution requirement.

Honors Program in Art History

129G.* Art History Honors Seminar

129H.* Art History Honors Directed Group Study

*seminar

The completion of both the Art History Honors Seminar and the Art History Honors Directed Group Study counts as one course toward the fulfillment of the Group III requirement.

Students who meet the criteria may, with permission of the art history faculty adviser or the Art History Honors Seminar instructor, enroll in the Art History Honors Program during the last quarter of their junior year or as a senior. This program is open to juniors and seniors who meet eligibility requirements. Please consult with the departmental adviser for these requirements.

Media Major

With a visual arts foundation, the program is designed for students who want to become creative videomakers, filmmakers, photographers, and computer artists, encouraging the hybridity of media. The curriculum combines hands-on experience of making with practical and theoretical criticism, provides historical, social, and aesthetic backgrounds for the understanding of modern media, and emphasizes creativity, versatility, and intelligence over technical specializations. It should allow students to go on to more specialized graduate programs in the media arts, to seek careers in film, television, computing, or photography, or to develop as independent artists. All media majors should see the visual arts undergraduate adviser upon entrance into UC San Diego.

Lower Division

Foundation Level

Six courses required.

VIS 22. Formations of Modern Art

VIS 70N. Introduction to Media

VIS 84. History of Film

Choose two art making courses:

VIS 1. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 2. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 3. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 41. Design Communication

VIS 60. Introduction to Digital Photography

VIS 80. Introduction to the Studio Major

Choose one history course:

VIS 20. Introduction to Art History

VIS 21A. Introduction to Art of the Americas

VIS 21B. Introduction to Asian Art

VIS 84. History of Film

Upper Division

Intermediate Level

Seven courses required.

VIS 111. Structure of Art

VIS 174*. Media Sketchbook

Choose four art making courses:

VIS 164*. Photographic Strategies

VIS 165*. Camera Techniques

VIS 171*. Digital Cinema

VIS 175*. Editing—Theory and Production

VIS 176*. 16 mm Filmmaking

VIS 177*. Scripting Strategies

VIS 178*. Sound—Theory and Production

Choose one interdisciplinary course:

VIS 100. Introduction to Public Culture

VIS 102. Cross-Border Urbanization

VIS 105A. Drawing: Representing the Subject

VIS 105D. The Aesthetics of Chinese Calligraphy

VIS 106A. Painting: Image Making

VIS 107A. Sculpture: Making the Object

VIS 142*. Practices in Computing Arts

VIS 145A*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media I

VIS 147A*. Electronic Technologies for Art I

ICAM 120*. Virtual Environments

History and Theory

Three courses required.

Choose three from:

Any upper-division art history course: VIS 120-129

Any upper-division media history course: VIS 150-159, 194S

Note: Any courses in the art history distributional requirement (http://visarts.ucsd.edu/~gd4/art-historytheorycriticism-major) can be taken to fulfill history and theory courses.

Advanced Level

Four courses required.

Choose three art making courses:

VIS 167*. Social Engagement in Photography

VIS 168*. Pictorialism and Constructed Reality

VIS 180A*. Documentary

VIS 180B*. Fiction and Allegory in Current Media Practices

VIS 181*. Sound and Lighting

VIS 182*. Advanced Editing

VIS 183A*. Strategies of Self

VIS 183B*. Strategies of Alterity

Choose one interdisciplinary course:

VIS 108. Advanced Projects in Art

VIS 109*. Advanced Projects in Media

VIS 110A-J. Advanced—Various Topics

VIS 130*. Special Topics in Visual Arts

VIS 131*. Special Projects in Media

VIS 132*. Installation Production and Studio

VIS 145B*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media

VIS 147B*. Electronic Technologies for Art II

VIS 148. Visualizing Art Practice

VIS 149. Seminar in Contemporary Computer Topics

VIS 185*. Senior Media Projects

VIS 197. Media Honors Thesis

VIS 198. Directed Group Study

VIS 199. Special Studies in Visual Arts

ICAM 110. Computing in the Arts: Current Practice

Note: Enrollment in production courses is limited to two per quarter.

Interdisciplinary Computing and the Arts (ICAM)

The interdisciplinary computing and the arts major in the Departments of Music and Visual Arts draws upon, and aims to bring together, ideas and paradigms from computer science, art, and cultural theory. It takes for granted that the computer has become a metamedium and that artists working with computers are expected to combine different media forms in their works. All of this makes the program unique among currently existing computer art or design programs which, on the one hand, usually focus on the use of computers for a particular media (for instance, specializing in computer animation, or computer music, or computer design for print) and, on the other hand, do not enter into a serious dialogue with current research in computer science, only teaching the students “off-the-shelf” software.

The program also recognizes that creating sophisticated artistic works with computers requires a new model of the creative process, one which combines traditional artistic procedures with the experimental research characteristic of the sciences. All in all, it aims to train a new type of cultural producer, who is familiar with art and media history, who is equally proficient with computer programming and artistic skills, who is always ready to learn new technologies, and who is comfortable interacting with scientists and computer industry resources.

The goals of the program are

Lower Division

Foundation Level

Seven to ten courses required.

MUS 4. Introduction to Western Music

VIS 22. Formations of Modern Art

VIS 41. Design Communication

VIS 70N. Introduction to Media

Choose one computer science sequence:

CSE 11. Introduction to Computer Science: JAVA

or

CSE 8A. Introduction. to Computer Science: JAVA

CSE 8B. Introduction. to Computer Science: JAVA Continued

Choose one mathematics sequence:

Math 15A/CSE 20. Discrete Mathematics

or

Math 20A. Calculus for Science and Engineering

Math 20B. Calculus for Science and Engineering

or

Math 10A. Calculus

Math 10B. Calculus

Math 10C. Calculus

Choose one art making course:

VIS 1. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 2. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 3. Introduction to Art Making

VIS 60. Introduction to Digital Photography

VIS 80. Introduction to the Studio Major

Upper Division

Intermediate Level

Seven courses required.

ICAM 110. Computing in the Arts: Current Practice

VIS 142*. Practices in Computing Arts

VIS 145A*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media I

MUS 171*. Computer Music I

Choose two art making courses:

VIS 141A*. Computer Programming for the Arts

VIS 147A*. Electronic Technologies for Art I    

ICAM 120*. Virtual Environments

MUS 170*. Musical Acoustics

MUS 172*. Computer Music II

MUS 173. Audio Production: Mixing and Editing

MUS 174A-C. Recording/MIDI Studio Techniques

Choose one interdisciplinary course:

VIS 100. Introduction to Public Culture

VIS 102. Cross-Border Urbanization

VIS 105A. Drawing: Representing the Subject

VIS 105D. Aesthetics of Chinese Calligraphy

VIS 106A. Painting: Image Making

VIS 107A. Sculpture: Making the Object

VIS 164*. Photographic Strategies

VIS 165*. Camera Techniques: Analog Futures

VIS 174*. Media Sketchbook

Advanced Level

Four courses required.

Choose one art making course:

VIS 141B*. Computer Programming for the Arts II

VIS 145B*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media II

VIS 147A*. Electronic Technologies for Art II

Required two courses:

ICAM 160A. Senior Project in Computer Arts I

ICAM 160B. Senior Project in Computer Arts II

Choose one interdisciplinary course:

ICAM 120*. Virtual Environments

VIS 108. Advanced Projects in Art

VIS 109*. Advanced Projects in Media

VIS 110A-J. Advanced—Various Topics

VIS 130*. Special Projects in Media

VIS 131*. Special Projects in Media

VIS 132*. Installation Productions and Studio

VIS 141A*. Computer Programming for the Arts I

VIS 147A*. Electronic Technologies for Art I

VIS 148. Visualizing Art Practice

VIS 149. Seminar in Contemporary Computer Topics

VIS 167. Social Engagement and Photography

VIS 168. Pictorialism and Constructed Reality

VIS 185. Senior Media Projects

VIS 198. Directed Group Study

VIS 199. Special Studies in Visual Arts

AIP 197. Academic Internship Program

MUS 172. Computer Music II

Note: VIS 141A, 147A, and ICAM 120 may be taken for the intermediate or advanced level, but not both.

Theory and History

Two courses required.

VIS 159. History of Art and Technology

and one of

VIS 151. History of the Experimental Film

VIS 152. Film in Social Context

VIS 152D. Identity through Transnational Cinema

VIS 153. The Genre Series

VIS 154. Hard Look at the Movies

VIS 155. The Director Series

VIS 156. Latino American Cinema

VIS 158. Histories of Photography

VIS 194S. Fantasy in Film

MUS 111. Topics/World Music Traditions

MUS 114. Music of the Twentieth Century

Senior Project

Two courses required.

ICAM 160A. Senior Project in Computer Arts I

ICAM 160B. Senior Project in Computer Arts II

Note: Enrollment in production courses is limited to two per quarter. Production courses are numbered VIS 109, 131, 132, 140, 141A-B, 145A, 145B, 147A-B, 174. ICAM 120, 160A-B.

Speculative Design

The major structure includes required and elective courses at both the lower- and upper-division levels. It is designed to give speculative design majors within the Department of Visual Arts (1) a broad foundation in the historical and disciplinary issues within the arts and humanities, (2) rigorous history, theory, and methodology courses in speculative design, (3) unique studio-based courses in which studios develop original projects, both individually and in groups, and (4) the opportunity to customize their emphasis within the major to best suit their professional goals.

Lower Division

Foundation Level

Four courses, sixteen units.

VIS 1 or 2 or 3. Introduction to Art Making: 2-D Practices

VIS 22. Formations of Modern Art

VIS 30. Introduction to Speculative Design

VIS 41. Design Communication

Breadth Electives

Two courses, eight to fourteen units.

VIS 60. Introduction to Digital Photography

VIS 70N*. Introduction to Media

VIS 80. Introduction to Studio

COGS 1. Introduction to Cognitive Science

COGS 10. Cognitive Consequences of Technology

COGS 14A. Introduction to Research Methods

COGS 17. Neurobiology of Cognition

COMM 10. Introduction to Communication

CSE 11**. Introduction to Computer Science: Java

CSE 12. Basic Data Structures and Object Oriented Design

USP 1. History of US Urban Communities

USP 2. Urban World System

USP 3. The City and Social Theory

*Note: VIS 70N is required for the media design emphasis.

**Note: CSE 11 is required for the design/computing emphasis, and can be taken as the two-course sequence CSE 8A-B.

Upper Division

Intermediate Level

Four courses, sixteen units.

VIS 100. Introduction to Public Culture

VIS 111. Structure of Art

VIS 135. Collaborative Research, Methodologies, and Management

VIS 142. Practices in Computing Arts

Emphasis

Three courses, twelve units.

Choose one emphasis:

Design Systems Emphasis

Choose three:

VIS 149. Contemporary Computer Topics

VIS 161. Systems and Networks at Scale

VIS 162. Speculative Science and Design Invention

VIS 163. Design Research and Criticism

Media Design Emphasis

VIS 145A*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media I

VIS 149. Contemporary Computer Topics

VIS 174*. Media Sketchbook

Design/Computing Emphasis

VIS 141A*. Introduction to Computer Programming in the Arts

VIS 147A*. Electronic Technologies for Art I

VIS 149. Contemporary Computer Topics

Public Culture/Urban Ecologies Emphasis

VIS 100A. Design of Public Culture

VIS 101. Introduction to Urban Ecologies

VIS 101A. Design of Urban Ecologies

History and Theory

Three courses, twelve to fourteen units.

VIS 159. History of Art, Design, and Technology

ICAM 110. Computing in the Arts: Current Practice

and

Choose one course from the speculative design history and theory list:

VIS 120A. Greek Arts

VIS 120B. Roman Arts

VIS 120C. Late Antique Art

VIS 121AN. Art and Experience in the Middle Ages

VIS 121B. Church and Mosque: Medieval Art and Architecture between Christianity and Islam

VIS 122AN. Renaissance Art

VIS 122CN. Leonardo da Vinci in Context

VIS 122D. Michelangelo

VIS 122F. Leonardo’s La Gioconda

VIS 122GS. The City in Italy

VIS 123AN. Between Spirit and Flesh: Northern Art of the Early Renaissance

VIS 124BN. Art and the Enlightenment

VIS 124CN. Nineteenth-Century Art

VIS 125A. Twentieth-Century Art

VIS 125BN. Contemporary Art

VIS 125DN. Marcel Duchamp

VIS 125F. Latin American Film

VIS 126AN. Pre-Columbian Art of Ancient Mexico and Central America

VIS 126BN. The Art and Civilization of the Ancient Maya

VIS 126C. Problems in Mesoamerican Art History

VIS 126D.Problems in Ancient Maya Iconography and Inscriptions

VIS 126HN. Pacific Coast American Indian Art

VIS 126I. Southwest American Indian Art

VIS 126J. African and Afro-American Art

VIS 126K. Oceanic Art

VIS 126P. Latin American Art: 1890–1950

VIS 126Q. Latin American Art: 1950–Present

VIS 127B. Arts of China

VIS 127C. Arts of Modern China

VIS 127D. Early Chinese Painting

VIS 127E. Later Chinese Painting

VIS 127F. Japanese Buddhist Art

VIS 127GS. Issues in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Art

VIS 127N. Twentieth-Century Art in China and Japan

VIS 127P. Arts of Japan

VIS127Q. Japanese Painting and Prints

VIS 128A. Topics in Premodern Art History

VIS 128C. Topics in Modern Art History

VIS 128D. Topics in Art History of the Americas

VIS 128E. Topics in Art History of Asia

VIS 151. History of the Experimental Film

VIS 152. Film in Social Context

VIS 152D. Identity Through Transnational Cinemas

VIS 153. The Genre Series

VIS 154. Hard Look at the Movies

VIS 155. The Director Series

VIS 156. Latino American Cinema

VIS 158. Histories of Photography

VIS 194S. Fantasy in Film

COGS 102A. Distributed Cognition

COGS 102B. Cognitive Ethnography

COGS 102C. Cognitive Design Studio

COGS 109. Modeling and Data Analysis

COGS 118A. Natural Computation I

COGS 118B. Natural Computation II

COGS 120. Interaction Design

COGS 187A. Usability and Information Architecture

COGS 187B. Practicum in Pro Web Design

COMM 111D. Critical Design Intermediate

COMM 124. Critical Design Advanced

COMM 146. Advanced Studies in Cultural Production

ETHN 101. Ethnic Images in Film

ETHN 102. Science and Technology in Society: Race/Gender/Class

ETHN 103. Environmental Racism

ETHN 104. Race, Space, and Segregation

ETHN 105. Ethnic Diversity and the City

ETHN 106. Life, Death, and the Human

ETHN 108. Race, Culture, and Social Change

ETHN 109. Race and Social Movements

LIGN 155. Evolution of Language

LIGN 165. Computational Linguistics

LIGN 176. Language of Politics and Advertising

LTCS 110. Popular Culture

LTCS 120. Historical Perspectives on Culture

LTCS 130. Gender, Race/Ethnicity, Class, and Culture

LTCS 131. Topics in Queer Cultures

LTCS 132. Topics in Social Identities and the Media

LTCS 133. Globalization and Culture

LTCS 170. Visual Culture

POLI 102E. Urban Politics

POLI 120F. Mass Media and Politics

TDGE 130. Let There Be Light!

Advanced Electives

Two courses, eight units.

VIS 100A. Design of Public Culture

VIS 101. Introduction to Urban Ecologies

VIS 101A. Design of Urban Ecologies

VIS 109*. Advanced Projects in Media

VIS 141A*. Introduction to Computer Programming in the Arts

VIS 141B*. Advanced Computer Programming in the Arts

VIS 145A*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media I

VIS 145B*. Time- and Process-Based Digital Media II

VIS 149. Contemporary Computing Topics

VIS 161. Systems and Networks at Scale

VIS 162. Speculative Science and Design Invention

VIS 163. Systems and Synthesis: Topics in Design Research and Criticism

VIS 174*. Media Sketchbook

VIS 178*. Sound: Theory and Production

TDGE 126. Storytelling and Design in Animation

TDDE 141. Theater Process (Sound Design)

TDDE 142. Advanced Sound Design

Note: Courses may not overlap with emphasis.

Design Master Studio

One course, eight units.

VIS 190. Design Master Studio